Towards a theory of micro-institutional processes: Forgotten roots, links to social-psychological research, and new ideas

Lynne G. Zucker, Oliver Schilke

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors weave together a set of ideas that lead us closer to a more general institutional theory – one that embraces multiple levels of analysis, including the micro-level. The authors build on the roots of micro-institutional thought – including phenomenological and ethnomethodological underpinnings – as well as very active, social-psychological research areas that address key mechanisms in institutionalization. Among these, the authors discuss the important roles of legitimacy, trust, social influence, and routines. There is great promise for micro-institutional inquiry to make an integral contribution to institutional theory by bringing processes and people back in.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationResearch in the Sociology of Organizations
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.
Pages371-389
Number of pages19
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Publication series

NameResearch in the Sociology of Organizations
Volume65B
ISSN (Print)0733-558X

Keywords

  • Experiments
  • Institutional theory
  • Legitimacy
  • Micro-institutionalism
  • Routines
  • Trust

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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    Zucker, L. G., & Schilke, O. (2019). Towards a theory of micro-institutional processes: Forgotten roots, links to social-psychological research, and new ideas. In Research in the Sociology of Organizations (pp. 371-389). (Research in the Sociology of Organizations; Vol. 65B). Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0733-558X2019000065B029