Towards characterizing the adaptive capacity of farmer-managed irrigation systems: learnings from Nepal

Bhuwan Thapa, Christopher A Scott, Philippus Wester, Robert G Varady

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Small-scale irrigation systems managed by farmers are facing multiple challenges including competing water demand, climatic variability and change, and socioeconomic transformation. Though the relevant institutions for irrigation management have developed coping and adaptation mechanisms, the intensity and frequency of the changes have weakened their institutional adaptive capacity. Using case examples mostly from Nepal, this paper studies the interconnections between seven key dimensions of adaptive capacity: the five capitals (human, financial, natural, social, and physical), governance, and learning. Long-term adaptation requires harnessing the synergies and tradeoffs between generic adaptive capacity that fosters broader development goals and specific adaptive capacity that strengthens climate-risk management. Measuring and addressing the interrelations among the seven adaptive-capacity dimensions aids in strengthening the long term sustainability of farmer-managed irrigation systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-44
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Opinion in Environmental Sustainability
Volume21
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Nepal
irrigation system
irrigation
farmer
learning
human capital
water demand
sustainability
climate
interconnection
synergy
risk management
coping
governance
water
demand
management
measuring
socioeconomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Towards characterizing the adaptive capacity of farmer-managed irrigation systems : learnings from Nepal. / Thapa, Bhuwan; Scott, Christopher A; Wester, Philippus; Varady, Robert G.

In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Vol. 21, 01.08.2016, p. 37-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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