Traditional knowledge, ritual behavior, and contemporary interpretations of the archaeological record-an ojibwa perspective

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The implementation of federal laws aimed at preserving Native American religious practices and associated resources has opened an opportunity to revisit the vast body of accumulated knowledge about ancient religious beliefs and corresponding behavioral systems. Whether recorded in writing or held in the memory of contemporary people, this body of knowledge contains important clues for investigating the cultural logic of native worldviews that informed religious activity. Federally mandated research conducted in collaboration with Native Americans complements ethnography and archaeology by furnishing an explicit and systematic assessment and interpretation of material culture, archaeological deposits, and associated physiography by the descendants of prehistoric religious practitioners (Zedeño 2000). Unfortunately, as Shaafsma (2004) notes in a recent article about Navajo interpretations of archaeological remains, the politics of repatriation of human remains and sacred objects as well as the recalcitrance of archaeological epistemologies have overshadowed any potential benefits and contributions of sustained interaction with Native Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBelief in the Past
Subtitle of host publicationTheoretical Approaches to the Archaeology of Religion
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages259-274
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781315433080
ISBN (Print)9781598743418
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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