Trajectories of smoking among freshmen college students with prior smoking history and risk for future smoking: Data from the University Project Tobacco Etiology Research Network (UpTERN) study

Craig R. Colder, Brian R. Flay, Eisuke Segawa, Donald Hedeker, David B. Abrams, Christopher Agnew, Robert L. Balster, Richard R. Clayton, Linda M. Collins, Ronald E. Dahl, Lisa C. Dierker, Eric C. Donny, Lorah Dorn, Tom Eissenberg, Brian P. Flaherty, Gary A. Giovino, Jack Henningfield, George F. Koob, Lan Liang, Robert J. McMahonKathleen R. Merikangus, Mark Nichter, Mimi Nichter, Dennis Prager, Elizabeth E. Loyd-Richardson, William Shadel, Saul Shiffman, Laura Stroud, Stephen Tiffany

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims: Little is known about smoking during the transition to college. The current study examined trajectories of smoking among college freshmen, how trajectories predicted later smoking and the social context of smoking. Design: Weekly assessments of daily smoking were collected via the web during the first year of college for a large cohort with a previous history of smoking. Participants and setting: A total of 193 college freshmen from a large public university with a previous history of smoking who smoked frequently enough to be included in trajectory analysis. Measurements: Measures included weekly reports of daily smoking, family smoking, perceived peer attitudes and smoking, social norms and social smoking environment. Findings: Seven trajectories were identified: one of low-level sporadic smoking, one of low-level smoking with a small increase during the year, two classes with a substantial decrease during the year, two classes with relatively small decreases and one class with a substantial increase in smoking. Trajectories of smoking in the freshman year predicted levels of sophomore year smoking, and some social context variables tended to change as smoking increased or decreased for a given trajectory class. Conclusions: The transition into college is marked by changes in smoking, with smoking escalating for some students and continuing into the sophomore year. Shifts in social context that support smoking were associated with trajectories of smoking. Despite the focus of developmental models on smoking in early adolescence, the transition into college warrants further investigation as a dynamic period for smoking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1534-1543
Number of pages10
JournalAddiction
Volume103
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2008

Keywords

  • Cigarette smoking
  • College students
  • Emerging adulthood
  • Mixture modeling
  • Social effects
  • Social influence
  • Trajectories

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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    Colder, C. R., Flay, B. R., Segawa, E., Hedeker, D., Abrams, D. B., Agnew, C., Balster, R. L., Clayton, R. R., Collins, L. M., Dahl, R. E., Dierker, L. C., Donny, E. C., Dorn, L., Eissenberg, T., Flaherty, B. P., Giovino, G. A., Henningfield, J., Koob, G. F., Liang, L., ... Tiffany, S. (2008). Trajectories of smoking among freshmen college students with prior smoking history and risk for future smoking: Data from the University Project Tobacco Etiology Research Network (UpTERN) study. Addiction, 103(9), 1534-1543. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2008.02280.x