Transfusio n-associated necrotizing enterocolitis: Evidence and uncertainty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis (TANEC) has been described as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that arises within 48 hours of a blood transfusion. It has been shown to be associated with 25% to 35% of NEC cases in recent studies. Evidence related to TANEC is limited to observational, retrospective studies. Infants who develop TANEC tend to be smaller, born preterm, more severely ill, and develop NEC after 30 days of age. Evidence in 2 studies support holding feedings during transfusion to protect the preterm gut from the cascade of events that lead to NEC, but higher quality research, including prospective randomized controlled trials, is needed to evaluate the effect of feeding on TANEC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-236
Number of pages5
JournalAdvances in Neonatal Care
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012

Fingerprint

Necrotizing Enterocolitis
Uncertainty
Blood Transfusion
Observational Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • Necrotizing enterocolitis risk
  • Neonatal transfusion guidelines
  • Neonate
  • Transfusion-associated gut injury
  • Transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Transfusio n-associated necrotizing enterocolitis : Evidence and uncertainty. / Gephart, Sheila M.

In: Advances in Neonatal Care, Vol. 12, No. 4, 08.2012, p. 232-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5fb85227a1314d24ac381318977057d9,
title = "Transfusio n-associated necrotizing enterocolitis: Evidence and uncertainty",
abstract = "Transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis (TANEC) has been described as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that arises within 48 hours of a blood transfusion. It has been shown to be associated with 25{\%} to 35{\%} of NEC cases in recent studies. Evidence related to TANEC is limited to observational, retrospective studies. Infants who develop TANEC tend to be smaller, born preterm, more severely ill, and develop NEC after 30 days of age. Evidence in 2 studies support holding feedings during transfusion to protect the preterm gut from the cascade of events that lead to NEC, but higher quality research, including prospective randomized controlled trials, is needed to evaluate the effect of feeding on TANEC.",
keywords = "Necrotizing enterocolitis risk, Neonatal transfusion guidelines, Neonate, Transfusion-associated gut injury, Transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis",
author = "Gephart, {Sheila M}",
year = "2012",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1097/ANC.0b013e31825e20ee",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "232--236",
journal = "Advances in Neonatal Care",
issn = "1536-0903",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transfusio n-associated necrotizing enterocolitis

T2 - Evidence and uncertainty

AU - Gephart, Sheila M

PY - 2012/8

Y1 - 2012/8

N2 - Transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis (TANEC) has been described as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that arises within 48 hours of a blood transfusion. It has been shown to be associated with 25% to 35% of NEC cases in recent studies. Evidence related to TANEC is limited to observational, retrospective studies. Infants who develop TANEC tend to be smaller, born preterm, more severely ill, and develop NEC after 30 days of age. Evidence in 2 studies support holding feedings during transfusion to protect the preterm gut from the cascade of events that lead to NEC, but higher quality research, including prospective randomized controlled trials, is needed to evaluate the effect of feeding on TANEC.

AB - Transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis (TANEC) has been described as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that arises within 48 hours of a blood transfusion. It has been shown to be associated with 25% to 35% of NEC cases in recent studies. Evidence related to TANEC is limited to observational, retrospective studies. Infants who develop TANEC tend to be smaller, born preterm, more severely ill, and develop NEC after 30 days of age. Evidence in 2 studies support holding feedings during transfusion to protect the preterm gut from the cascade of events that lead to NEC, but higher quality research, including prospective randomized controlled trials, is needed to evaluate the effect of feeding on TANEC.

KW - Necrotizing enterocolitis risk

KW - Neonatal transfusion guidelines

KW - Neonate

KW - Transfusion-associated gut injury

KW - Transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84868629170&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84868629170&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/ANC.0b013e31825e20ee

DO - 10.1097/ANC.0b013e31825e20ee

M3 - Article

C2 - 22864004

AN - SCOPUS:84868629170

VL - 12

SP - 232

EP - 236

JO - Advances in Neonatal Care

JF - Advances in Neonatal Care

SN - 1536-0903

IS - 4

ER -