Translation priming with different scripts: Masked priming with cognates and noncognates in Hebrew-English bilinguals

Tamar H. Gollan, Kenneth I Forster, Ram Frost

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269 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hebrew-English cognates (translations similar in meaning and form) and noncognates (translations similar in meaning only) were examined in masked translation priming. Enhanced priming for cognates was found with L1 (dominant language) primes, but unlike previous results, it was not found with L2 (nondominant language) primes. Priming was also obtained for noncognates, whereas previous studies showed unstable effects for such stimuli. The authors interpret the results in a dual-lexicon model by suggesting that (a) both orthographic and phonological overlap are needed to establish shared lexical entries for cognates (and hence also symmetric cognate priming), and (b) script differences facilitate rapid access by providing a cue to the lexical processor that directs access to the proper lexicon, thus producing stable noncognate priming. The asymmetrical cognate effect obtained with different scripts may be attributed to an overreliance on phonology in L2 reading.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1122-1139
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Volume23
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1997

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Language
Cues
Reading
phonology
language
stimulus
Cognates
Priming
Masked Priming
Lexicon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Hebrew-English cognates (translations similar in meaning and form) and noncognates (translations similar in meaning only) were examined in masked translation priming. Enhanced priming for cognates was found with L1 (dominant language) primes, but unlike previous results, it was not found with L2 (nondominant language) primes. Priming was also obtained for noncognates, whereas previous studies showed unstable effects for such stimuli. The authors interpret the results in a dual-lexicon model by suggesting that (a) both orthographic and phonological overlap are needed to establish shared lexical entries for cognates (and hence also symmetric cognate priming), and (b) script differences facilitate rapid access by providing a cue to the lexical processor that directs access to the proper lexicon, thus producing stable noncognate priming. The asymmetrical cognate effect obtained with different scripts may be attributed to an overreliance on phonology in L2 reading.",
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N2 - Hebrew-English cognates (translations similar in meaning and form) and noncognates (translations similar in meaning only) were examined in masked translation priming. Enhanced priming for cognates was found with L1 (dominant language) primes, but unlike previous results, it was not found with L2 (nondominant language) primes. Priming was also obtained for noncognates, whereas previous studies showed unstable effects for such stimuli. The authors interpret the results in a dual-lexicon model by suggesting that (a) both orthographic and phonological overlap are needed to establish shared lexical entries for cognates (and hence also symmetric cognate priming), and (b) script differences facilitate rapid access by providing a cue to the lexical processor that directs access to the proper lexicon, thus producing stable noncognate priming. The asymmetrical cognate effect obtained with different scripts may be attributed to an overreliance on phonology in L2 reading.

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