Treating the tough cases in juvenile drug court: Individual and organizational practices leading to success or failure

Michael P Polakowski, Roger E. Hartley, Leigh Bates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drug Courts are a fundamental change to trial courts. They are considered less adversarial and may alter past notions of treatment for offenders. One goal of drug courts is to provide defendants the opportunity to alter their drug-addicted lifestyles through intense supervision, feedback, treatment, and graduated sanctions and rewards for behavior. This study uses logistic regression to examine measures of failure such as termination from drug court and two measures of offender recidivism. Although the literature on drug courts has been developing for several years, the reality is that universal templates for explanation do not yet exist in the juvenile arena. This paper examines correlates that explain the above measures of failure. The study also proposes the creation of new measures that may assist future research. Findings indicate that participant experiences within the drug court program are the strongest predictors of termination and recidivism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)379-404
Number of pages26
JournalCriminal Justice Review
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

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drug
offender
sanction
supervision
reward
logistics
regression
experience

Keywords

  • Drug courts
  • Failure
  • Juvenile
  • Recidivism
  • Therapeutic jurisprudence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law

Cite this

Treating the tough cases in juvenile drug court : Individual and organizational practices leading to success or failure. / Polakowski, Michael P; Hartley, Roger E.; Bates, Leigh.

In: Criminal Justice Review, Vol. 33, No. 3, 09.2008, p. 379-404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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