Treatment for alexia with agraphia following left ventral occipito-temporal damage: Strengthening orthographic representations common to reading and spelling

Esther S. Kim, Kindle Rising, Steven Z Rapcsak, Pelagie M Beeson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Damage to left ventral occipito-temporal cortex can give rise to written language impairment characterized by pure alexia/letter-by-letter (LBL) reading, as well as surface alexia and agraphia. The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic effects of a combined treatment approach to address concurrent LBL reading with surface alexia/agraphia. Method: Simultaneous treatment to address slow reading and errorful spelling was administered to 3 individuals with reading and spelling impairments after left ventral occipito-temporal damage due to posterior cerebral artery stroke. Single-word reading/spelling accuracy, reading latencies, and text reading were monitored as outcome measures for the combined effects of multiple oral re-reading treatment and interactive spelling treatment. Results: After treatment, participants demonstrated faster and more accurate single-word reading and improved text-reading rates. Spelling accuracy also improved, particularly for untrained irregular words, demonstrating generalization of the trained interactive spelling strategy. Conclusion: This case series characterizes concomitant LBL with surface alexia/agraphia and demonstrates a successful treatment approach to address both the reading and spelling impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1521-1537
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume58
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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