Tree-rings, forest history and cultural heritage: Current state and future prospects of dendroarchaeology in the Iberian Peninsula

M. Domínguez-Delmás, R. Alejano-Monge, S. Van Daalen, E. Rodríguez-Trobajo, I. García-González, J. Susperregi, T. Wazny, E. Jansma

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

We review the current state of dendroarchaeology in the Iberian Peninsula and discuss its potential, outlining the particular relevance and complexity of this territory and its material heritage for dendroarchaeological studies. Whereas dendrochronology is used throughout the rest of Europe to answer questions about cultural heritage, the application of dendroarchaeology in the Iberian Peninsula has been remarkably underrepresented in comparison to dendroecology and dendroclimatology. Existing tree-ring chronologies in this territory have a widespread geographical coverage, but are often too short to allow dendroarchaeological studies, resulting in inadequate assessments of material heritage made of wood in and originating from the Iberian Peninsula. However, different studies have demonstrated that dendroarchaeology has a great potential in the area. This review illustrates the rich variety of Iberian material heritage from different periods and cultures covering over 8000 years that could profit from dendrochronological research. Future research possibilities in relation to the available Iberian heritage in Spain, Portugal and worldwide are proposed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-196
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Archaeological Science
Volume57
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Keywords

  • Ancient wood
  • Archaeology
  • Art history
  • Dendrochronology
  • Portugal
  • Shipbuilding
  • Spain
  • Timber trade

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • Archaeology

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