TWO SMALL TEMPERATE PLANETS TRANSITING NEARBY M DWARFS IN K2 CAMPAIGNS 0 AND 1

Joshua E. Schlieder, Ian J M Crossfield, Erik A. Petigura, Andrew W. Howard, Kimberly M. Aller, Evan Sinukoff, Howard T. Isaacson, Benjamin J. Fulton, David R. Ciardi, Mickaël Bonnefoy, Carl Ziegler, Timothy D. Morton, Sébastien Lépine, Christian Obermeier, Michael C. Liu, Vanessa P. Bailey, Christoph Baranec, Charles A. Beichman, Denis Defrère, Thomas Henning & 4 others Philip M Hinz, Nicholas Law, Reed Riddle, Andrew Skemer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prime Kepler mission revealed that small planets (⊕) are common, especially around low-mass M dwarfs. K2, the repurposed Kepler mission, continues this exploration of small planets around small stars. Here we combine K2 photometry with spectroscopy, adaptive optics imaging, and archival survey images to analyze two small planets orbiting the nearby field-age M dwarfs, K2-26 (EPIC 202083828) and K2-9. K2-26 is an M1.0 ± 0.5 dwarf at 93 ± 7 pc from K2 Campaign 0. We validate its planet with a day period of 14.5665 and estimate a radius of 2.67-0.42 +0.46 R. K2-9 is an M2.5 ± 0.5 dwarf at 110 ± 12 pc from K2 Campaign 1. K2-9b was first identified by Montet et al.; here we present spectra and adaptive optics imaging of the host star and independently validate and characterize the planet. Our analyses indicate K2-9b is a 2.25-0.96 +0.53 R planet with a 18.4498 day period. K2-26b exhibits a transit duration that is too long to be consistent with a circular orbit given its measured stellar radius. Thus, the long transits are likely due to the photoeccentric effect and our transit fits hint at an eccentric orbit. Both planets receive low incident flux from their host stars and have estimated equilibrium temperatures

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number87
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume818
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 10 2016

Fingerprint

planets
planet
transit
Kepler mission
adaptive optics
stars
eccentric orbits
radii
circular orbits
photometry
spectroscopy
optics
estimates
temperature

Keywords

  • eclipses
  • stars: individual (K2-26, K2-9)
  • techniques: photometric
  • techniques: spectroscopic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

Schlieder, J. E., Crossfield, I. J. M., Petigura, E. A., Howard, A. W., Aller, K. M., Sinukoff, E., ... Skemer, A. (2016). TWO SMALL TEMPERATE PLANETS TRANSITING NEARBY M DWARFS IN K2 CAMPAIGNS 0 AND 1. Astrophysical Journal, 818(1), [87]. https://doi.org/10.3847/0004-637X/818/1/87

TWO SMALL TEMPERATE PLANETS TRANSITING NEARBY M DWARFS IN K2 CAMPAIGNS 0 AND 1. / Schlieder, Joshua E.; Crossfield, Ian J M; Petigura, Erik A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Sinukoff, Evan; Isaacson, Howard T.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Ciardi, David R.; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Ziegler, Carl; Morton, Timothy D.; Lépine, Sébastien; Obermeier, Christian; Liu, Michael C.; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Baranec, Christoph; Beichman, Charles A.; Defrère, Denis; Henning, Thomas; Hinz, Philip M; Law, Nicholas; Riddle, Reed; Skemer, Andrew.

In: Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 818, No. 1, 87, 10.02.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schlieder, JE, Crossfield, IJM, Petigura, EA, Howard, AW, Aller, KM, Sinukoff, E, Isaacson, HT, Fulton, BJ, Ciardi, DR, Bonnefoy, M, Ziegler, C, Morton, TD, Lépine, S, Obermeier, C, Liu, MC, Bailey, VP, Baranec, C, Beichman, CA, Defrère, D, Henning, T, Hinz, PM, Law, N, Riddle, R & Skemer, A 2016, 'TWO SMALL TEMPERATE PLANETS TRANSITING NEARBY M DWARFS IN K2 CAMPAIGNS 0 AND 1', Astrophysical Journal, vol. 818, no. 1, 87. https://doi.org/10.3847/0004-637X/818/1/87
Schlieder JE, Crossfield IJM, Petigura EA, Howard AW, Aller KM, Sinukoff E et al. TWO SMALL TEMPERATE PLANETS TRANSITING NEARBY M DWARFS IN K2 CAMPAIGNS 0 AND 1. Astrophysical Journal. 2016 Feb 10;818(1). 87. https://doi.org/10.3847/0004-637X/818/1/87
Schlieder, Joshua E. ; Crossfield, Ian J M ; Petigura, Erik A. ; Howard, Andrew W. ; Aller, Kimberly M. ; Sinukoff, Evan ; Isaacson, Howard T. ; Fulton, Benjamin J. ; Ciardi, David R. ; Bonnefoy, Mickaël ; Ziegler, Carl ; Morton, Timothy D. ; Lépine, Sébastien ; Obermeier, Christian ; Liu, Michael C. ; Bailey, Vanessa P. ; Baranec, Christoph ; Beichman, Charles A. ; Defrère, Denis ; Henning, Thomas ; Hinz, Philip M ; Law, Nicholas ; Riddle, Reed ; Skemer, Andrew. / TWO SMALL TEMPERATE PLANETS TRANSITING NEARBY M DWARFS IN K2 CAMPAIGNS 0 AND 1. In: Astrophysical Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 818, No. 1.
@article{b9205f119f1c42758ec60f55bbf77497,
title = "TWO SMALL TEMPERATE PLANETS TRANSITING NEARBY M DWARFS IN K2 CAMPAIGNS 0 AND 1",
abstract = "The prime Kepler mission revealed that small planets (⊕) are common, especially around low-mass M dwarfs. K2, the repurposed Kepler mission, continues this exploration of small planets around small stars. Here we combine K2 photometry with spectroscopy, adaptive optics imaging, and archival survey images to analyze two small planets orbiting the nearby field-age M dwarfs, K2-26 (EPIC 202083828) and K2-9. K2-26 is an M1.0 ± 0.5 dwarf at 93 ± 7 pc from K2 Campaign 0. We validate its planet with a day period of 14.5665 and estimate a radius of 2.67-0.42 +0.46 R⊕. K2-9 is an M2.5 ± 0.5 dwarf at 110 ± 12 pc from K2 Campaign 1. K2-9b was first identified by Montet et al.; here we present spectra and adaptive optics imaging of the host star and independently validate and characterize the planet. Our analyses indicate K2-9b is a 2.25-0.96 +0.53 R⊕ planet with a 18.4498 day period. K2-26b exhibits a transit duration that is too long to be consistent with a circular orbit given its measured stellar radius. Thus, the long transits are likely due to the photoeccentric effect and our transit fits hint at an eccentric orbit. Both planets receive low incident flux from their host stars and have estimated equilibrium temperatures",
keywords = "eclipses, stars: individual (K2-26, K2-9), techniques: photometric, techniques: spectroscopic",
author = "Schlieder, {Joshua E.} and Crossfield, {Ian J M} and Petigura, {Erik A.} and Howard, {Andrew W.} and Aller, {Kimberly M.} and Evan Sinukoff and Isaacson, {Howard T.} and Fulton, {Benjamin J.} and Ciardi, {David R.} and Micka{\"e}l Bonnefoy and Carl Ziegler and Morton, {Timothy D.} and S{\'e}bastien L{\'e}pine and Christian Obermeier and Liu, {Michael C.} and Bailey, {Vanessa P.} and Christoph Baranec and Beichman, {Charles A.} and Denis Defr{\`e}re and Thomas Henning and Hinz, {Philip M} and Nicholas Law and Reed Riddle and Andrew Skemer",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "10",
doi = "10.3847/0004-637X/818/1/87",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "818",
journal = "Astrophysical Journal",
issn = "0004-637X",
publisher = "IOP Publishing Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - TWO SMALL TEMPERATE PLANETS TRANSITING NEARBY M DWARFS IN K2 CAMPAIGNS 0 AND 1

AU - Schlieder, Joshua E.

AU - Crossfield, Ian J M

AU - Petigura, Erik A.

AU - Howard, Andrew W.

AU - Aller, Kimberly M.

AU - Sinukoff, Evan

AU - Isaacson, Howard T.

AU - Fulton, Benjamin J.

AU - Ciardi, David R.

AU - Bonnefoy, Mickaël

AU - Ziegler, Carl

AU - Morton, Timothy D.

AU - Lépine, Sébastien

AU - Obermeier, Christian

AU - Liu, Michael C.

AU - Bailey, Vanessa P.

AU - Baranec, Christoph

AU - Beichman, Charles A.

AU - Defrère, Denis

AU - Henning, Thomas

AU - Hinz, Philip M

AU - Law, Nicholas

AU - Riddle, Reed

AU - Skemer, Andrew

PY - 2016/2/10

Y1 - 2016/2/10

N2 - The prime Kepler mission revealed that small planets (⊕) are common, especially around low-mass M dwarfs. K2, the repurposed Kepler mission, continues this exploration of small planets around small stars. Here we combine K2 photometry with spectroscopy, adaptive optics imaging, and archival survey images to analyze two small planets orbiting the nearby field-age M dwarfs, K2-26 (EPIC 202083828) and K2-9. K2-26 is an M1.0 ± 0.5 dwarf at 93 ± 7 pc from K2 Campaign 0. We validate its planet with a day period of 14.5665 and estimate a radius of 2.67-0.42 +0.46 R⊕. K2-9 is an M2.5 ± 0.5 dwarf at 110 ± 12 pc from K2 Campaign 1. K2-9b was first identified by Montet et al.; here we present spectra and adaptive optics imaging of the host star and independently validate and characterize the planet. Our analyses indicate K2-9b is a 2.25-0.96 +0.53 R⊕ planet with a 18.4498 day period. K2-26b exhibits a transit duration that is too long to be consistent with a circular orbit given its measured stellar radius. Thus, the long transits are likely due to the photoeccentric effect and our transit fits hint at an eccentric orbit. Both planets receive low incident flux from their host stars and have estimated equilibrium temperatures

AB - The prime Kepler mission revealed that small planets (⊕) are common, especially around low-mass M dwarfs. K2, the repurposed Kepler mission, continues this exploration of small planets around small stars. Here we combine K2 photometry with spectroscopy, adaptive optics imaging, and archival survey images to analyze two small planets orbiting the nearby field-age M dwarfs, K2-26 (EPIC 202083828) and K2-9. K2-26 is an M1.0 ± 0.5 dwarf at 93 ± 7 pc from K2 Campaign 0. We validate its planet with a day period of 14.5665 and estimate a radius of 2.67-0.42 +0.46 R⊕. K2-9 is an M2.5 ± 0.5 dwarf at 110 ± 12 pc from K2 Campaign 1. K2-9b was first identified by Montet et al.; here we present spectra and adaptive optics imaging of the host star and independently validate and characterize the planet. Our analyses indicate K2-9b is a 2.25-0.96 +0.53 R⊕ planet with a 18.4498 day period. K2-26b exhibits a transit duration that is too long to be consistent with a circular orbit given its measured stellar radius. Thus, the long transits are likely due to the photoeccentric effect and our transit fits hint at an eccentric orbit. Both planets receive low incident flux from their host stars and have estimated equilibrium temperatures

KW - eclipses

KW - stars: individual (K2-26, K2-9)

KW - techniques: photometric

KW - techniques: spectroscopic

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959421266&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84959421266&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3847/0004-637X/818/1/87

DO - 10.3847/0004-637X/818/1/87

M3 - Article

VL - 818

JO - Astrophysical Journal

JF - Astrophysical Journal

SN - 0004-637X

IS - 1

M1 - 87

ER -