Unanticipated events, perceptions, and household labor allocation in Zimbabwe

Anna Josephson, Gerald E. Shively

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper investigates labor allocation as a strategy for coping with unanticipated events. We evaluate household responses to unforeseen death and rainfall shocks in Zimbabwe, during a period in which many households were already stressed due to the country's long-term economic crisis. In this context, shocks compound existing stresses. Different types of shocks disparately affect household labor allocation. Household perceptions about the shocks experienced also shift labor use. Perceived rainfall shocks positively affect the share of labor allocated to migration-related activities and negatively affect the share of labor allocated to non-participation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number105377
JournalWorld Development
Volume141
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

Keywords

  • Africa
  • Hyperinflation
  • Idiosyncratic and covariate shocks
  • Labor allocation
  • Migration
  • Zimbabwe

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics and Econometrics

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