Under-dosing of etomidate for rapid sequence intubation in the emergency department

Brittany R. Traylor, Asad E Patanwala, John C. Sakles, Brian L Erstad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if patients who weigh ≥100 kg are more likely to receive under-dosing of etomidate compared to those who weigh <100 kg for rapid sequence intubation in the emergency department (ED). Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in an academic ED in the United States. Adult patients who received etomidate for rapid sequence intubation were evaluated and categorized into two groups based on weight: 1) <100 kg or 2) ≥100 kg. The mean dose of etomidate (mg/kg) was compared between the groups using an unpaired Student's t-test. The percentage of patients who received under-dosing (less than 0.2 mg/kg) was compared between groups using the Chi-squared test. Results: A total of 200 patients were included in the final analyses (100 patients in the <100 kg group and 100 patients in the ≥100 kg group). There were no baseline differences in age, sex, paralytic used, or trauma status between the treatment groups. The mean etomidate dose (mg/kg ± standard deviation) was significantly lower in the ≥100 kg group compared to the <100 kg group (0.18 ± 0.03 vs 0.28 ± 0.07, respectively; p<0.001). There were significantly more patients in the ≥100 kg group who received under-dosing of etomidate compared to the <100 kg group (68% vs 2%, respectively; p<0.001). Conclusions: Patients who weigh ≥100 kg are more likely to receive under-dosing of etomidate compared to those who weigh <100 kg for rapid sequence intubation in the ED.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-256
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Drug Safety
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Etomidate
Intubation
Hospital Emergency Service
Students
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Weights and Measures
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Emergency department
  • Etomidate
  • Obesity
  • Rapid sequence intubation
  • Sedation
  • Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Under-dosing of etomidate for rapid sequence intubation in the emergency department. / Traylor, Brittany R.; Patanwala, Asad E; Sakles, John C.; Erstad, Brian L.

In: Current Drug Safety, Vol. 8, No. 4, 2013, p. 253-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if patients who weigh ≥100 kg are more likely to receive under-dosing of etomidate compared to those who weigh <100 kg for rapid sequence intubation in the emergency department (ED). Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in an academic ED in the United States. Adult patients who received etomidate for rapid sequence intubation were evaluated and categorized into two groups based on weight: 1) <100 kg or 2) ≥100 kg. The mean dose of etomidate (mg/kg) was compared between the groups using an unpaired Student's t-test. The percentage of patients who received under-dosing (less than 0.2 mg/kg) was compared between groups using the Chi-squared test. Results: A total of 200 patients were included in the final analyses (100 patients in the <100 kg group and 100 patients in the ≥100 kg group). There were no baseline differences in age, sex, paralytic used, or trauma status between the treatment groups. The mean etomidate dose (mg/kg ± standard deviation) was significantly lower in the ≥100 kg group compared to the <100 kg group (0.18 ± 0.03 vs 0.28 ± 0.07, respectively; p<0.001). There were significantly more patients in the ≥100 kg group who received under-dosing of etomidate compared to the <100 kg group (68{\%} vs 2{\%}, respectively; p<0.001). Conclusions: Patients who weigh ≥100 kg are more likely to receive under-dosing of etomidate compared to those who weigh <100 kg for rapid sequence intubation in the ED.",
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