Understanding the medication adherence strategies of older adults with hypertension

Kenneth A. Blocker, Kathleen C Insel, Kari M. Koerner, Wendy A. Rogers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Many older adults are living with at least one chronic disease and must adhere to prescribed medication to mitigate and control its impact. Hypertension is one chronic disease that affects a significant portion of the world's population, especially older adults, and is responsible for a high number of annual deaths. It is asymptomatic, meaning that there are no perceptible symptoms and, as such, older adults may struggle with adhering to their prescribed antihypertensive medications. How one internalizes the disease may influence the degree of success in managing the condition. The current study analyzed archival data from a multifaceted prospective memory intervention for older adults with hypertension who were nonadherent to their medication. We coded their responses to self-management interview questions to identify the common themes regarding the knowledge and sense of control the older adults held relevant to managing their illness. Participants' responses revealed how they internalized hypertension and their medication, as well as the strategies and goals they reportedly used to manage the illness. The association strategy was found to be the most commonly used within participants' routines. In addition, many participants expressed a general lack of knowledge about the disease or their medication, and their goals regarding hypertension management were general and inexplicit (e.g., "to reduce their blood pressure). This information informs the design of more effective and longer-lasting interventions geared toward significantly improving the medication adherence of older adults diagnosed with hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages11-15
Number of pages5
Volume2017-October
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289531
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
EventHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017 - Austin, United States
Duration: Oct 9 2017Oct 13 2017

Other

OtherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017
CountryUnited States
CityAustin
Period10/9/1710/13/17

Fingerprint

hypertension
medication
Disease
Blood pressure
illness
world population
management
Data storage equipment
death
lack
interview

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Blocker, K. A., Insel, K. C., Koerner, K. M., & Rogers, W. A. (2017). Understanding the medication adherence strategies of older adults with hypertension. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017 (Vol. 2017-October, pp. 11-15). Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213601498

Understanding the medication adherence strategies of older adults with hypertension. / Blocker, Kenneth A.; Insel, Kathleen C; Koerner, Kari M.; Rogers, Wendy A.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017. Vol. 2017-October Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., 2017. p. 11-15.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Blocker, KA, Insel, KC, Koerner, KM & Rogers, WA 2017, Understanding the medication adherence strategies of older adults with hypertension. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017. vol. 2017-October, Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., pp. 11-15, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017, Austin, United States, 10/9/17. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213601498
Blocker KA, Insel KC, Koerner KM, Rogers WA. Understanding the medication adherence strategies of older adults with hypertension. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017. Vol. 2017-October. Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc. 2017. p. 11-15 https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213601498
Blocker, Kenneth A. ; Insel, Kathleen C ; Koerner, Kari M. ; Rogers, Wendy A. / Understanding the medication adherence strategies of older adults with hypertension. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017. Vol. 2017-October Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., 2017. pp. 11-15
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