University Music Educators' Perceptions of the Importance of Public-School-Related Off-Campus Activities

Donald L Hamann, Joy E. Lawrence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine: (a) whether any significant differences existed within university music educators' responses to each of 16 activities, identified previously to be “recognized” off campus activities, in the categories of frequency of performance, effectiveness in helping keep them up-to-date with public school settings, and perceived importance of each activity in tenure/promotion decisions, (b) whether any significant differences existed between university music educators' responses in these evaluation categories (frequency, effectiveness, and importance) according to the perceived role and expectation of the different institutions, (c) how often university music educators performed each of 16 activities, (d) how effective university music educators thought each of the 16 activities would be in keeping them up-to-date with public school settings, (e) the university music educators' perception of the importance of each activity in tenure/promotion decisions, and (f) whether university music educators' responses to the perceived effectiveness of the 16 activities differed from previously obtained responses of public school music educators. From analyses, it was found that significant differences existed within and between university music educators' responses by category, between university music educators' responses by institutional role and expectation, and between effectiveness rankings of public school and university music educators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)330-341
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Research in Music Education
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Music

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