Unpacking Walkability: Testing the Influence of Urban Design Features on Perceptions of Walking Environment Attractiveness

Arlie S Adkins, Jennifer Dill, Gretchen Luhr, Margaret Neal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The potential environmental and health benefits of active transportation modes (e.g. walking and cycling) have led to considerable research on the influence of the built environment on travel. This paper presents the findings of a study combining environmental audits and a survey-based respondent mapping tool to test the influence of micro-scale built environment characteristics, including 'green street' storm water management features, on resident perceptions of walking environment attractiveness. Results suggest that this method is sensitive enough to unpack a concept like walkability into individual component characteristics. Findings from an ordinary least squares (OLS) regression model indicate that in a predominantly single-family residential context well-designed green street facilities, as well as other features such as parks, separation from vehicle traffic, and pedestrian network connectivity can significantly contribute to walking environment attractiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)499-510
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Urban Design
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

urban design
walking
social attraction
transportation mode
pedestrian
connectivity
water management
audit
travel
traffic
resident
regression
Attractiveness
Testing
Urban Design
health
built environment
Built Environment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Urban Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Unpacking Walkability : Testing the Influence of Urban Design Features on Perceptions of Walking Environment Attractiveness. / Adkins, Arlie S; Dill, Jennifer; Luhr, Gretchen; Neal, Margaret.

In: Journal of Urban Design, Vol. 17, No. 4, 11.2012, p. 499-510.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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