Urban containment and central-city revitalization

Arthur Christian Nelson, Raymond J. Burby, Edward Feser, Casey J. Dawkins, Emil E. Malizia, Roberto Quercia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Planners throughout the 20th century have advocated containment of urban sprawl through a variety of means. Urban containment is incorporated into the growth management programs of several states, and growth management policies exist in at least 95 metropolitan areas. One objective of containment is to concentrate development within areas that are already urbanized, particularly in central cities. In this article, we examine the effects of the first round of urban containment programs (adopted prior to 1985) on the amount of development activity taking place in central cities and on the ratio of central-city to metropolitan-area development activity. Our findings indicate that central cities in contained metrdpolitan areas are attracting more development activity than cenral cities in uncontained areas. However, suburban areas in both contained and uncontained metropolitan areas continue to grow. We surmise that containment shifts development from exurban and rural areas to suburban and urban ones because of containment boundaries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)411-425
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of the American Planning Association
Volume70
Issue number4
StatePublished - Sep 2004
Externally publishedYes

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containment
agglomeration area
metropolitan area
urban sprawl
management
suburban area
rural area
city

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Nelson, A. C., Burby, R. J., Feser, E., Dawkins, C. J., Malizia, E. E., & Quercia, R. (2004). Urban containment and central-city revitalization. Journal of the American Planning Association, 70(4), 411-425.

Urban containment and central-city revitalization. / Nelson, Arthur Christian; Burby, Raymond J.; Feser, Edward; Dawkins, Casey J.; Malizia, Emil E.; Quercia, Roberto.

In: Journal of the American Planning Association, Vol. 70, No. 4, 09.2004, p. 411-425.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nelson, AC, Burby, RJ, Feser, E, Dawkins, CJ, Malizia, EE & Quercia, R 2004, 'Urban containment and central-city revitalization', Journal of the American Planning Association, vol. 70, no. 4, pp. 411-425.
Nelson AC, Burby RJ, Feser E, Dawkins CJ, Malizia EE, Quercia R. Urban containment and central-city revitalization. Journal of the American Planning Association. 2004 Sep;70(4):411-425.
Nelson, Arthur Christian ; Burby, Raymond J. ; Feser, Edward ; Dawkins, Casey J. ; Malizia, Emil E. ; Quercia, Roberto. / Urban containment and central-city revitalization. In: Journal of the American Planning Association. 2004 ; Vol. 70, No. 4. pp. 411-425.
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