Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction Secondary to Crossing Vessels-To Transpose or Not? The Robotic Experience

Ugur Boylu, Mathew Oommen, Benjamin R. Lee, Raju Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: We compared the surgical outcomes of robot assisted laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty in patients presenting with anterior crossing vessels with and without transposition of the crossing vessel. Materials and Methods: A total of 107 patients with ureteropelvic junction obstruction underwent robot assisted laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty. Evaluation of surgical success was based on validated pain scores, diuretic renography and imaging results, including excretory urography, computerized tomography or ultrasound. Results: Anterior crossing vessels were identified in 48 patients (44.9%) and vessels were transposed in 18 (37.5%) (group 1). No transposition was performed in 30 patients (62.5%) (group 2). Mean radiological followup was 52.9 weeks in group 1 and 65.3 weeks in group 2 (p = 0.181). Mean pain score on a scale of 10 was 0.82 in group 1 and 0.74 in group 2 (p = 0.917). A Whitaker test performed in 3 patients with persistent pain was negative. Preoperatively mean differential function on the affected side was 35.1% in group 1 and 36.9% in group 2 (p = 0.133). Half-time was calculated as a mean of 46.3 minutes in group 1 and 49.4 minutes in group 2 (p = 0.541). In groups 1 and 2 mean postoperative differential function improved to 41.1% and 40.9%, and mean half-time improved to 7.43 and 8.03 minutes, respectively (p = 0.491). A comparison of preoperative and postoperative differential function, and half-time in each group showed a statistically significant difference. The radiographic and symptomatic success rate was 100% with no open conversion and recurrence. Conclusions: Comparison of robot assisted laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty outcomes revealed similar success rates in terms of the change in symptoms and renal function in patients with or without anterior crossing vessel transposition. Transposition of crossing vessel should only be performed when the anatomical relation dictates and it should be an intraoperative decision.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1751-1755
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume181
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • cardiovascular abnormalities
  • kidney
  • laparoscopy
  • robotics
  • ureter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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