Use of a live attenuated varicella vaccine to boost varicella-specific immune responses in seropositive people 55 years of age and older: Duration of booster effect

Myron J. Levin, Deb Barber, Eileen Goldblatt, Michelle Jones, Bonnie LaFleur, Christina Chan, Diane Stinson, Gary O. Zerbe, Anthony R. Hayward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

127 Scopus citations

Abstract

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV)-specific T cell immunity was measured in 130 persons ≥55 years of age 6 years after they received a live attenuated VZV vaccine. Circulating T cells, which proliferated in vitro in response to VZV antigen, were enumerated (VZV responder cell frequency assay). Six years after the booster vaccination, the VZV-responding cell frequency (1/61,000 circulating cells) was still significantly (P < .05) improved over the baseline measurements (1/70,000) and appears to have diminished the expected decline in frequency as these vaccinees aged (to 1/86,000). Ten herpes- zoster-like clinical events were recorded. Although the frequency of these events, 1/100 patient-years, is within the expected range of such events for this age cohort, the number of lesions was small, there was very little pain, and there was no postherpetic neuralgia. These results support the development of a vaccine to prevent or attenuate herpes zoster.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S109-S112
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume178
Issue number5 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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