Use of antidepressants and statins and short-term risk of new-onset diabetes among high risk adults

Rituparna Bhattacharya, Mayank Ajmera, Sandipan Bhattacharjee, Usha Sambamoorthi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: We evaluated the association of combined use of antidepressants and statins and the risk of new-onset diabetes among high-risk adults. Methods: We used a retrospective, observational, longitudinal design among adults (age ≥22 years) who were diabetes free at baseline and had reported hypertension or hyperlipidemia or heart disease. We used data were from 2004 to 2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and identified from self-reported diabetes or insulin use. We categorized antidepressants and statins use into four groups: antidepressants only, statins only, combined use of antidepressants and statins (antidepressants-statins), and neither antidepressant nor statins. We conducted chi-square and multivariable logistic regressions to examine the association between use of antidepressants-statins and new-onset diabetes after controlling for demographic and economic characteristics, health-status, access to care, presence of depression, and lifestyle risk factors. Results: In our study sample, 9.3% used antidepressants only, 10.7% used statins only and 2.4% adults reported use of antidepressants-statins. Nearly 2% of the study sample reported new-onset diabetes. In unadjusted analyses, significantly higher proportion of adults using antidepressants-statins (3.2%) reported new-onset diabetes compared to those using neither antidepressants nor statins (1.1%). However, after controlling for all other variables in multivariable regression we did not observe a statistically significant association between use of antidepressants-statins and new-onset diabetes. Conclusions: Our study results do not suggest that use of antidepressants-statins may increase the risk of new-onset diabetes. Future research needs to examine this relationship with specific combinations of these drug classes and using longer follow up periods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-260
Number of pages10
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume105
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Antidepressive Agents

Keywords

  • Antidepressants
  • New-onset diabetes
  • Statins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Use of antidepressants and statins and short-term risk of new-onset diabetes among high risk adults. / Bhattacharya, Rituparna; Ajmera, Mayank; Bhattacharjee, Sandipan; Sambamoorthi, Usha.

In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 105, No. 2, 2014, p. 251-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{850f28d23077496fb311b5bd4c724633,
title = "Use of antidepressants and statins and short-term risk of new-onset diabetes among high risk adults",
abstract = "Aims: We evaluated the association of combined use of antidepressants and statins and the risk of new-onset diabetes among high-risk adults. Methods: We used a retrospective, observational, longitudinal design among adults (age ≥22 years) who were diabetes free at baseline and had reported hypertension or hyperlipidemia or heart disease. We used data were from 2004 to 2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and identified from self-reported diabetes or insulin use. We categorized antidepressants and statins use into four groups: antidepressants only, statins only, combined use of antidepressants and statins (antidepressants-statins), and neither antidepressant nor statins. We conducted chi-square and multivariable logistic regressions to examine the association between use of antidepressants-statins and new-onset diabetes after controlling for demographic and economic characteristics, health-status, access to care, presence of depression, and lifestyle risk factors. Results: In our study sample, 9.3{\%} used antidepressants only, 10.7{\%} used statins only and 2.4{\%} adults reported use of antidepressants-statins. Nearly 2{\%} of the study sample reported new-onset diabetes. In unadjusted analyses, significantly higher proportion of adults using antidepressants-statins (3.2{\%}) reported new-onset diabetes compared to those using neither antidepressants nor statins (1.1{\%}). However, after controlling for all other variables in multivariable regression we did not observe a statistically significant association between use of antidepressants-statins and new-onset diabetes. Conclusions: Our study results do not suggest that use of antidepressants-statins may increase the risk of new-onset diabetes. Future research needs to examine this relationship with specific combinations of these drug classes and using longer follow up periods.",
keywords = "Antidepressants, New-onset diabetes, Statins",
author = "Rituparna Bhattacharya and Mayank Ajmera and Sandipan Bhattacharjee and Usha Sambamoorthi",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1016/j.diabres.2014.04.016",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "105",
pages = "251--260",
journal = "Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice",
issn = "0168-8227",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of antidepressants and statins and short-term risk of new-onset diabetes among high risk adults

AU - Bhattacharya, Rituparna

AU - Ajmera, Mayank

AU - Bhattacharjee, Sandipan

AU - Sambamoorthi, Usha

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Aims: We evaluated the association of combined use of antidepressants and statins and the risk of new-onset diabetes among high-risk adults. Methods: We used a retrospective, observational, longitudinal design among adults (age ≥22 years) who were diabetes free at baseline and had reported hypertension or hyperlipidemia or heart disease. We used data were from 2004 to 2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and identified from self-reported diabetes or insulin use. We categorized antidepressants and statins use into four groups: antidepressants only, statins only, combined use of antidepressants and statins (antidepressants-statins), and neither antidepressant nor statins. We conducted chi-square and multivariable logistic regressions to examine the association between use of antidepressants-statins and new-onset diabetes after controlling for demographic and economic characteristics, health-status, access to care, presence of depression, and lifestyle risk factors. Results: In our study sample, 9.3% used antidepressants only, 10.7% used statins only and 2.4% adults reported use of antidepressants-statins. Nearly 2% of the study sample reported new-onset diabetes. In unadjusted analyses, significantly higher proportion of adults using antidepressants-statins (3.2%) reported new-onset diabetes compared to those using neither antidepressants nor statins (1.1%). However, after controlling for all other variables in multivariable regression we did not observe a statistically significant association between use of antidepressants-statins and new-onset diabetes. Conclusions: Our study results do not suggest that use of antidepressants-statins may increase the risk of new-onset diabetes. Future research needs to examine this relationship with specific combinations of these drug classes and using longer follow up periods.

AB - Aims: We evaluated the association of combined use of antidepressants and statins and the risk of new-onset diabetes among high-risk adults. Methods: We used a retrospective, observational, longitudinal design among adults (age ≥22 years) who were diabetes free at baseline and had reported hypertension or hyperlipidemia or heart disease. We used data were from 2004 to 2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and identified from self-reported diabetes or insulin use. We categorized antidepressants and statins use into four groups: antidepressants only, statins only, combined use of antidepressants and statins (antidepressants-statins), and neither antidepressant nor statins. We conducted chi-square and multivariable logistic regressions to examine the association between use of antidepressants-statins and new-onset diabetes after controlling for demographic and economic characteristics, health-status, access to care, presence of depression, and lifestyle risk factors. Results: In our study sample, 9.3% used antidepressants only, 10.7% used statins only and 2.4% adults reported use of antidepressants-statins. Nearly 2% of the study sample reported new-onset diabetes. In unadjusted analyses, significantly higher proportion of adults using antidepressants-statins (3.2%) reported new-onset diabetes compared to those using neither antidepressants nor statins (1.1%). However, after controlling for all other variables in multivariable regression we did not observe a statistically significant association between use of antidepressants-statins and new-onset diabetes. Conclusions: Our study results do not suggest that use of antidepressants-statins may increase the risk of new-onset diabetes. Future research needs to examine this relationship with specific combinations of these drug classes and using longer follow up periods.

KW - Antidepressants

KW - New-onset diabetes

KW - Statins

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84906043374&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84906043374&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.diabres.2014.04.016

DO - 10.1016/j.diabres.2014.04.016

M3 - Article

VL - 105

SP - 251

EP - 260

JO - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

JF - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

SN - 0168-8227

IS - 2

ER -