Use of Emergency Ultrasound in Arizona Community Emergency Departments

Richard Amini, Michael T. Wyman, Nicholas C. Hernandez, John A Guisto, Srikar R Adhikari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Despite the increased educational exposure to point-of-care ultrasound (US) at all levels of medical training, there are utilization gaps between academic and nonacademic emergency department (ED) settings. The purpose of this study was to assess the current practices and potential barriers to the use of point-of-care US in nonacademic EDs throughout the state of Arizona. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study. An online questionnaire was electronically sent to all nonacademic EDs in Arizona. The survey consisted of questions regarding demographics, current practice patterns, policies, interdepartmental agreements, and perceptions regarding the use of point-of-care US. Results: Seventy nonacademic EDs were identified for inclusion in our study, and 58 EDs completed the survey, which represented an 83% response rate. Seventy-eight percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 67%-89%) perform or interpret point-of-care US examinations for patient care. The 3 most common applications of point-of-care US reported by respondents were focused assessment with sonography for trauma, cardiac US examinations, and line placement, and 36% (95% CI, 22%-50%) bill for point-of-care US examinations. At 75% (95% CI, 62%-88%) of EDs, no one is specifically responsible for reviewing point-of-care US examinations for quality assurance, and at 50% (95% CI, 35%-65%), no mechanism exists to archive images. Eighty-three percent (95% CI, 72%-94%) of EDs think that their groups will benefit from the American College of Emergency Physicians Clinical Ultrasound Accreditation Program. Conclusions: Ultrasound equipment is available in nearly all nonacademic EDs in Arizona. However, it appears that most providers lack US training, credentialing, quality assurance, and reimbursement mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)913-921
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Ultrasound in Medicine
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

Point-of-Care Systems
Hospital Emergency Service
Emergencies
Confidence Intervals
Reimbursement Mechanisms
Credentialing
Accreditation
Ultrasonography
Patient Care
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Equipment and Supplies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • clinical ultrasound
  • emergency ultrasound
  • point-of care ultrasound
  • ultrasound education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Use of Emergency Ultrasound in Arizona Community Emergency Departments. / Amini, Richard; Wyman, Michael T.; Hernandez, Nicholas C.; Guisto, John A; Adhikari, Srikar R.

In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, Vol. 36, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 913-921.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Amini, Richard ; Wyman, Michael T. ; Hernandez, Nicholas C. ; Guisto, John A ; Adhikari, Srikar R. / Use of Emergency Ultrasound in Arizona Community Emergency Departments. In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 36, No. 5. pp. 913-921.
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