Use of fulvic acid or sodium silicate-based sanitizers to inactivate listeria monocytogenes, salmonella typhimurium and pseudomonas aeruginosa on food contact surfaces

Libin Zhu, Norbert Chirase, Sadhana Ravishankar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of five fulvic acid-based and one sodium silicate-based sanitizers against Listeria monocytogenes, SalmonellaTyphimurium DT104 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on food contact surfaces. Minimum inhibitory concentration assays were conducted to determine the lowest effective concentration of sanitizers A, B, C, D, E and F against each bacterium. Stainless steel, high-density polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride and polycarbonate coupons were inoculated with the culture of one of the test organisms and dried for 1h. The coupons were then sprayed with sanitizer A, B, C, E or F, and treated for 2min. Samples were taken to enumerate the surviving organisms. The sanitizers reduced L.monocytogenes, S. Typhimurium and P.aeruginosa population by 2-6, 2.7-5.8 and 2-6log cfu/coupon on food contact surfaces, respectively. In general, the tested sanitizers were the most effective on P.aeruginosa, followed by S. Typhimurium and then L.monocytogenes. Practical Applications: Microorganisms attached to food contact surfaces can be a source of contamination of foods, leading to spoilage and food safety issues. Chemical disinfection with sanitizers is generally used to reduce the microbial contamination on food contact surfaces. Fulvic acid or sodium silicate-based sanitizers have been developed for use in food processing plants, but studies on the effects of these new sanitizers on food contact surfaces are limited. Our results demonstrated that sodium silicate-based sanitizer A and fulvic acid-based sanitizers B, C, E and F effectively reduced L.monocytogenes, S. Typhimurium and P.aeruginosa populations on stainless steel, high-density polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride and polycarbonate coupon surfaces. These results may help the food industry in selecting alternative sanitizers for cleaning food contact surfaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)132-140
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Food Safety
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Food Science
  • Microbiology

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