Use of grafted seedlings for vegetable production in North America

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Grafting of vegetable seedlings is a unique Asian horticultural technology practiced commercially for many years to overcome issues associated with intensive cultivation using limited arable land. This technology was introduced in Europe in the late 20th century, along with improved grafting methods suitable for commercial production of grafted vegetable seedlings. Grafting was later introduced in North America from Europe and it is now attracting many growers in Canada, US, Mexico, and even beyond. Grafting onto specific rootstocks generally provides resistance to soil-borne diseases and nematodes. In addition to such traditional advantages, increased yield by using grafted seedlings has been attracting the interest of greenhouse hydroponic (soil-less culture) tomato growers. This increased yield is due to the rootstock acting as a superior conductor of water, providing more water and nutrients to the stems, leaves and fruits, mainly because of the better developed root system. Currently, an estimated 40 million grafted seedlings are being used in North American greenhouses. There are several issues identified that currently limit the further promotion of using grafted seedlings in North America. Some of these issues are: limited number of propagators and rootstock varieties, long distance transportation, high market price of seeds and grafted seedlings, and the relatively large amount of seedlings requiring processing at one time due to demand by large vegetable production operations. Introduction of more grafted seedlings to open-field vegetable production is rather slow, but is expected in the near future along with the development of technologies to resolve the above mentioned issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationActa Horticulturae
Pages21-28
Number of pages8
Volume770
StatePublished - 2008
EventInternational Symposium on Cultivation and Utilization of Asian, Sub-Tropical, and Underutilized Horticultural Crops, IHC 2006 - Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: Aug 13 2006Aug 19 2006

Publication series

NameActa Horticulturae
Volume770
ISSN (Print)05677572

Other

OtherInternational Symposium on Cultivation and Utilization of Asian, Sub-Tropical, and Underutilized Horticultural Crops, IHC 2006
CountryKorea, Republic of
CitySeoul
Period8/13/068/19/06

Fingerprint

vegetable growing
seedlings
grafting (plants)
rootstocks
growers
greenhouses
soil-borne diseases
soilless culture
market prices
arable soils
hydroponics
root systems
water
Mexico
vegetables
Nematoda
Canada
tomatoes
stems
fruits

Keywords

  • Automation
  • Closed system
  • Grafting robot
  • Single-headed seedling
  • Storage
  • Transportation
  • Two-headed seedling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Horticulture

Cite this

Kubota, C. (2008). Use of grafted seedlings for vegetable production in North America. In Acta Horticulturae (Vol. 770, pp. 21-28). (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 770).

Use of grafted seedlings for vegetable production in North America. / Kubota, Chieri.

Acta Horticulturae. Vol. 770 2008. p. 21-28 (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 770).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kubota, C 2008, Use of grafted seedlings for vegetable production in North America. in Acta Horticulturae. vol. 770, Acta Horticulturae, vol. 770, pp. 21-28, International Symposium on Cultivation and Utilization of Asian, Sub-Tropical, and Underutilized Horticultural Crops, IHC 2006, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 8/13/06.
Kubota C. Use of grafted seedlings for vegetable production in North America. In Acta Horticulturae. Vol. 770. 2008. p. 21-28. (Acta Horticulturae).
Kubota, Chieri. / Use of grafted seedlings for vegetable production in North America. Acta Horticulturae. Vol. 770 2008. pp. 21-28 (Acta Horticulturae).
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