Use of household bleach for emergency disinfection of drinking water.

Sherif Abd Elmaksoud, Nikita Patel, Sherri L. Maxwell, Laura Y. Sifuentes, Charles P Gerba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Household bleach is typically used as a disinfectant for water in times of emergencies and by those engaging in recreational activities such as camping or rafting. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend a concentration of free chlorine of 1 mg/L for 30 minutes, or about 0.75 mL (1/8 teaspoon) of household bleach per gallon of water. The goal of the study described in this article was to assess two household bleach products to kill waterborne bacteria and viruses using the test procedures in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Guide Standard and Protocol for Testing Microbiological Purifiers. Bleach was found to meet these requirements in waters of low turbidity and organic matter. While the test bacterium was reduced by six logs in high turbid and organic-laden waters, the test viruses were reduced only by one-half to one log. In such waters greater chlorine doses or contact times are needed to achieve greater reduction of viruses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-25
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Environmental Health
Volume76
Issue number9
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Disinfection
Drinking Water
disinfection
Emergencies
drinking water
Water
virus
Chlorine
Viruses
chlorine
Camping
water
Household Products
Bacteria
United States Environmental Protection Agency
recreational activity
bacterium
disease control
Disinfectants
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Elmaksoud, S. A., Patel, N., Maxwell, S. L., Sifuentes, L. Y., & Gerba, C. P. (2014). Use of household bleach for emergency disinfection of drinking water. Journal of Environmental Health, 76(9), 22-25.

Use of household bleach for emergency disinfection of drinking water. / Elmaksoud, Sherif Abd; Patel, Nikita; Maxwell, Sherri L.; Sifuentes, Laura Y.; Gerba, Charles P.

In: Journal of Environmental Health, Vol. 76, No. 9, 2014, p. 22-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elmaksoud, SA, Patel, N, Maxwell, SL, Sifuentes, LY & Gerba, CP 2014, 'Use of household bleach for emergency disinfection of drinking water.', Journal of Environmental Health, vol. 76, no. 9, pp. 22-25.
Elmaksoud, Sherif Abd ; Patel, Nikita ; Maxwell, Sherri L. ; Sifuentes, Laura Y. ; Gerba, Charles P. / Use of household bleach for emergency disinfection of drinking water. In: Journal of Environmental Health. 2014 ; Vol. 76, No. 9. pp. 22-25.
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