Use of in vivo confocal microscopy in malignant melanoma

An aid in diagnosis and assessment of surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic approaches

Clara N Curiel, Christy M. Williams, Kirsty Joanna Swindells, Steven R. Tahan, Susie Astner, Robert A. Frankenthaler, Salvador González

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Melanomas with poorly defined borders, lack of pigmentation, lentiginous extension, and location in cosmetically sensitive regions represent diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Repeated surgical reexcisions are frequently required to achieve tumor-free margins. The use of reflectance mode confocal microscopy as an noninvasive method has shown to be a promising tool for diagnosing pigmented lesions in vivo. Observations: We report 3 clinical cases of melanoma: amelanotic melanoma (case 1), locally recurrent melanoma (case 2), and lentigo maligna melanoma (case 3). In case 1, in vivo confocal microscopy was instrumental in making the diagnosis and in monitoring the response to imiquimod therapy for in situ residual disease. It was also used to successfully delineate preoperative surgical margins in cases 2 and 3. Conclusion: As new methods for treating melanoma emerge and become more available, confocal microscopy can play a significant role by improving sensitivity in diagnosis, by increasing rates of successful initial excision, and by serving as a noninvasive means of monitoring therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1127-1132
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Dermatology
Volume140
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Confocal Microscopy
Melanoma
imiquimod
Hutchinson's Melanotic Freckle
Amelanotic Melanoma
Therapeutics
Pigmentation
Intravital Microscopy
Margins of Excision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Use of in vivo confocal microscopy in malignant melanoma : An aid in diagnosis and assessment of surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic approaches. / Curiel, Clara N; Williams, Christy M.; Swindells, Kirsty Joanna; Tahan, Steven R.; Astner, Susie; Frankenthaler, Robert A.; González, Salvador.

In: Archives of Dermatology, Vol. 140, No. 9, 09.2004, p. 1127-1132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Curiel, Clara N ; Williams, Christy M. ; Swindells, Kirsty Joanna ; Tahan, Steven R. ; Astner, Susie ; Frankenthaler, Robert A. ; González, Salvador. / Use of in vivo confocal microscopy in malignant melanoma : An aid in diagnosis and assessment of surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic approaches. In: Archives of Dermatology. 2004 ; Vol. 140, No. 9. pp. 1127-1132.
@article{b9cd96707940464ba0e56611f364185d,
title = "Use of in vivo confocal microscopy in malignant melanoma: An aid in diagnosis and assessment of surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic approaches",
abstract = "Background: Melanomas with poorly defined borders, lack of pigmentation, lentiginous extension, and location in cosmetically sensitive regions represent diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Repeated surgical reexcisions are frequently required to achieve tumor-free margins. The use of reflectance mode confocal microscopy as an noninvasive method has shown to be a promising tool for diagnosing pigmented lesions in vivo. Observations: We report 3 clinical cases of melanoma: amelanotic melanoma (case 1), locally recurrent melanoma (case 2), and lentigo maligna melanoma (case 3). In case 1, in vivo confocal microscopy was instrumental in making the diagnosis and in monitoring the response to imiquimod therapy for in situ residual disease. It was also used to successfully delineate preoperative surgical margins in cases 2 and 3. Conclusion: As new methods for treating melanoma emerge and become more available, confocal microscopy can play a significant role by improving sensitivity in diagnosis, by increasing rates of successful initial excision, and by serving as a noninvasive means of monitoring therapy.",
author = "Curiel, {Clara N} and Williams, {Christy M.} and Swindells, {Kirsty Joanna} and Tahan, {Steven R.} and Susie Astner and Frankenthaler, {Robert A.} and Salvador Gonz{\'a}lez",
year = "2004",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1001/archderm.140.9.1127",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "140",
pages = "1127--1132",
journal = "JAMA Dermatology",
issn = "2168-6068",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of in vivo confocal microscopy in malignant melanoma

T2 - An aid in diagnosis and assessment of surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic approaches

AU - Curiel, Clara N

AU - Williams, Christy M.

AU - Swindells, Kirsty Joanna

AU - Tahan, Steven R.

AU - Astner, Susie

AU - Frankenthaler, Robert A.

AU - González, Salvador

PY - 2004/9

Y1 - 2004/9

N2 - Background: Melanomas with poorly defined borders, lack of pigmentation, lentiginous extension, and location in cosmetically sensitive regions represent diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Repeated surgical reexcisions are frequently required to achieve tumor-free margins. The use of reflectance mode confocal microscopy as an noninvasive method has shown to be a promising tool for diagnosing pigmented lesions in vivo. Observations: We report 3 clinical cases of melanoma: amelanotic melanoma (case 1), locally recurrent melanoma (case 2), and lentigo maligna melanoma (case 3). In case 1, in vivo confocal microscopy was instrumental in making the diagnosis and in monitoring the response to imiquimod therapy for in situ residual disease. It was also used to successfully delineate preoperative surgical margins in cases 2 and 3. Conclusion: As new methods for treating melanoma emerge and become more available, confocal microscopy can play a significant role by improving sensitivity in diagnosis, by increasing rates of successful initial excision, and by serving as a noninvasive means of monitoring therapy.

AB - Background: Melanomas with poorly defined borders, lack of pigmentation, lentiginous extension, and location in cosmetically sensitive regions represent diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Repeated surgical reexcisions are frequently required to achieve tumor-free margins. The use of reflectance mode confocal microscopy as an noninvasive method has shown to be a promising tool for diagnosing pigmented lesions in vivo. Observations: We report 3 clinical cases of melanoma: amelanotic melanoma (case 1), locally recurrent melanoma (case 2), and lentigo maligna melanoma (case 3). In case 1, in vivo confocal microscopy was instrumental in making the diagnosis and in monitoring the response to imiquimod therapy for in situ residual disease. It was also used to successfully delineate preoperative surgical margins in cases 2 and 3. Conclusion: As new methods for treating melanoma emerge and become more available, confocal microscopy can play a significant role by improving sensitivity in diagnosis, by increasing rates of successful initial excision, and by serving as a noninvasive means of monitoring therapy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4544270070&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=4544270070&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/archderm.140.9.1127

DO - 10.1001/archderm.140.9.1127

M3 - Article

VL - 140

SP - 1127

EP - 1132

JO - JAMA Dermatology

JF - JAMA Dermatology

SN - 2168-6068

IS - 9

ER -