Use of multiple imaging modalities to detect ovarian cancer

Elizabeth Kanter, Ross Walker, Sam Marion, Patricia B Hoyer, Jennifer K Barton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Ovarian cancer is not a common cancer - approximately 25,000 new cases in 2004 - but it is the fifth leading cause of death from cancer in women (over 16,000 in 2004). Little is known about the precursors and early stages of ovarian cancer partially due to the lack of human samples at the early stages. A cohesive model that incorporates ovarian cancer induction into a menopausal rodent would be well suited for comprehensive studies of ovarian cancer. Non-destructive imaging would allow carcinogenesis to be followed. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) and Light-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) are minimally invasive optical modalities that allow both structural and biochemical changes to be noted. Rat ovaries were exposed to 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) for 20 days in order to destroy the primordial follicles. Plain sutures and sutures coated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a) anthracene (DMBA) were implanted in the right ovary, in order to produce epithelial based ovarian cancers (a plain suture was inserted in the control). Rats were sacrificed at 4 weeks and ovaries were harvested and imaged with a combined OCT/LIF system and with the OCM. Histology was preformed on the harvested ovaries and any pathology determined. Two of the ovaries were visually abnormal; the OCT/LIF imaging confirmed these abnormalities. The normal ovary OCM and OCT images show the organized structure of the ovary, the follicles, bursa and corpus lutea are visible. The OCM images show the disorganized structure of one of the abnormal ovaries. Overall this pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of both the animal model and optical imaging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
EditorsK.E. Bartels, L.S. Bass, W.T.W. Riese, K.W. Gregory, H. Hirschberg
Pages596-605
Number of pages10
Volume5686
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
EventPhotonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 22 2005Jan 25 2005

Other

OtherPhotonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/22/051/25/05

Fingerprint

Optical tomography
Microscopic examination
Imaging techniques
Fluorescence
Rats
Histology
Anthracene
Pathology
Animals

Keywords

  • DMBA
  • Light Induced Fluorescence
  • Menopause
  • Optical Coherence Microscopy
  • Optical Coherence Tomography
  • Ovarian cancer
  • VCD

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Kanter, E., Walker, R., Marion, S., Hoyer, P. B., & Barton, J. K. (2005). Use of multiple imaging modalities to detect ovarian cancer. In K. E. Bartels, L. S. Bass, W. T. W. Riese, K. W. Gregory, & H. Hirschberg (Eds.), Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 5686, pp. 596-605). [120] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.585560

Use of multiple imaging modalities to detect ovarian cancer. / Kanter, Elizabeth; Walker, Ross; Marion, Sam; Hoyer, Patricia B; Barton, Jennifer K.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. ed. / K.E. Bartels; L.S. Bass; W.T.W. Riese; K.W. Gregory; H. Hirschberg. Vol. 5686 2005. p. 596-605 120.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kanter, E, Walker, R, Marion, S, Hoyer, PB & Barton, JK 2005, Use of multiple imaging modalities to detect ovarian cancer. in KE Bartels, LS Bass, WTW Riese, KW Gregory & H Hirschberg (eds), Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 5686, 120, pp. 596-605, Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/22/05. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.585560
Kanter E, Walker R, Marion S, Hoyer PB, Barton JK. Use of multiple imaging modalities to detect ovarian cancer. In Bartels KE, Bass LS, Riese WTW, Gregory KW, Hirschberg H, editors, Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 5686. 2005. p. 596-605. 120 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.585560
Kanter, Elizabeth ; Walker, Ross ; Marion, Sam ; Hoyer, Patricia B ; Barton, Jennifer K. / Use of multiple imaging modalities to detect ovarian cancer. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. editor / K.E. Bartels ; L.S. Bass ; W.T.W. Riese ; K.W. Gregory ; H. Hirschberg. Vol. 5686 2005. pp. 596-605
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