Use of technology for educating melanoma patients

Nicole Marble, Lois J Loescher, Kyung Hee Lim, Heather Hiscox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluated the feasibility of using technology for melanoma patient education in a clinic setting. We assessed technology skill level and preferences for education. Data were collected using an adapted version of the Use of Technology Survey. Most participants owned a computer and DVD player and were skilled in the use of these devices, along with Internet and e-mail. Participants preferred the option of using in-clinic and at-home technology versus in-clinic only use. Computer and DVD applications were preferred because they were familiar and convenient. Using technology for patient education intervention is a viable option; however, patients' skill level and preferences for technology should be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-450
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Fingerprint

Melanoma
Technology
Patient Education
Postal Service
Internet
Education
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Educational technology
  • Melanoma
  • Patient education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Use of technology for educating melanoma patients. / Marble, Nicole; Loescher, Lois J; Lim, Kyung Hee; Hiscox, Heather.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 25, No. 3, 09.2010, p. 445-450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marble, Nicole ; Loescher, Lois J ; Lim, Kyung Hee ; Hiscox, Heather. / Use of technology for educating melanoma patients. In: Journal of Cancer Education. 2010 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 445-450.
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