Using accelerometer and gyroscope data in common mobile devices to assess credibility

Joseph S. Valacich, Michael D. Byrd, Manasvi Kumar, Jeffrey L. Jenkins, David Kim, Parker A. Williams

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

An observational study examined the efficacy of using accelerometer and gyroscope (i.e., orientation) data from standard mobile devices to assess response credibility. Study participants played twenty rounds of a card game where they self-reported whether they won or lost each round. Participants received a base payment but could gain increased “bonus” payments by cheating. After the card game, participants were asked a “Yes-No” question whether they cheated while their orientation data was captured. We predicted that people concealing information about an adverse behavior (i.e., cheating), would result in differences in both absolute magnitude changes in acceleration and in rotation, as compared to truthful people. We developed six measures to capture absolute magnitude changes using orientation data. Supporting our hypotheses, cheaters had greater values of acceleration/rotation rates than non-cheaters. The implications of these results for future research and practice, as well as the limitations of this study, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication26th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2020
PublisherAssociation for Information Systems
ISBN (Electronic)9781733632546
StatePublished - 2020
Event26th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2020 - Salt Lake City, Virtual, United States
Duration: Aug 10 2020Aug 14 2020

Publication series

Name26th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2020

Conference

Conference26th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2020
CountryUnited States
CitySalt Lake City, Virtual
Period8/10/208/14/20

Keywords

  • Accelerometer
  • Amazon's Mechanical Turk
  • Behavioral Analytics
  • Credibility Assessment
  • Gyroscope
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Mobile Phone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Information Systems
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Library and Information Sciences

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