Using combined 532 nm HSRL and 1064 nm elastic-scatter lidar observations to verify and update cram dual-wavelength aerosol retrieval models

John A Reagan, Christopher J. McPherson, Richard Ferrare, Chris Hostetler, Johnathan Hair

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The widely employed Fernald lidar equation solution relation [1] retrieves aerosol backscatter versus height for an assumed aerosol extinction-to- backscatter ratio, S a, and known system calibration factor, C, at a given wavelength, subject to the constraint/assumption that S a is spatially constant over the solution layer (height range). At 532 nm, the calibration factor may be estimated fairly accurately by Rayleigh (molecular) normalization in high-altitude, cleanair regions. For elevated aerosol layers embedded in clean air, the direct transmittance approach may be used to estimate the optical depth of the layer, thereby giving an auxiliary input that permits S a to be determined as a part of the solution. Otherwise, S a must be specified based on models or determined through use of some other constraining information. The retrieval at 1064 nm is more problematic because the molecular scatter contribution is much weaker, typically making it difficult to either calibrate by molecular normalization or to accurately estimate the transmittance of an elevated aerosol layer, particularly for the weak signals from satellite lidar or eye-safe airborne lidar. As such, aerosol retrievals from dual-wavelength satellite lidars such as those onboard ICESat and CALIPSO have largely been limited to 532 nm retrievals using a table look-up approach to select assumed S a values based on climatological/ geographically determined models. Dualwavelength retrievals using a Constrained Ratio Aerosol Model-fit (CRAM) retrieval method, employing AERONET based model ratio parameters, have also been obtained with some success for a few satellite lidar data sets [2],[3]. The additional information obtainable from a High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) instrument at 532 nm can be used to further constrain the retrieval problem in such a way that 1064 nm aerosol parameters may be retrieved in a less ambiguous way. Alternatively, given HSRL at 532 nm it should be possible to use this additional information, together with aerosol models, to verify elastic-scatter calibration at 1064 nm in the presence of aerosol or to update the CRAM models with the benefit of additionally constrained parameters at both wavelengths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInternational Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS)
Volume2
Edition1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Event2008 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium - Proceedings - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Jul 6 2008Jul 11 2008

Other

Other2008 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium - Proceedings
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period7/6/087/11/08

Fingerprint

Spectral resolution
Optical radar
spectral resolution
lidar
Aerosols
aerosol
wavelength
Wavelength
transmittance
Satellites
Calibration
calibration
backscatter
ICESat
CALIPSO
optical depth
extinction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Reagan, J. A., McPherson, C. J., Ferrare, R., Hostetler, C., & Hair, J. (2008). Using combined 532 nm HSRL and 1064 nm elastic-scatter lidar observations to verify and update cram dual-wavelength aerosol retrieval models. In International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS) (1 ed., Vol. 2). [4779055] https://doi.org/10.1109/IGARSS.2008.4779055

Using combined 532 nm HSRL and 1064 nm elastic-scatter lidar observations to verify and update cram dual-wavelength aerosol retrieval models. / Reagan, John A; McPherson, Christopher J.; Ferrare, Richard; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, Johnathan.

International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). Vol. 2 1. ed. 2008. 4779055.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Reagan, JA, McPherson, CJ, Ferrare, R, Hostetler, C & Hair, J 2008, Using combined 532 nm HSRL and 1064 nm elastic-scatter lidar observations to verify and update cram dual-wavelength aerosol retrieval models. in International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). 1 edn, vol. 2, 4779055, 2008 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium - Proceedings, Boston, MA, United States, 7/6/08. https://doi.org/10.1109/IGARSS.2008.4779055
Reagan JA, McPherson CJ, Ferrare R, Hostetler C, Hair J. Using combined 532 nm HSRL and 1064 nm elastic-scatter lidar observations to verify and update cram dual-wavelength aerosol retrieval models. In International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). 1 ed. Vol. 2. 2008. 4779055 https://doi.org/10.1109/IGARSS.2008.4779055
Reagan, John A ; McPherson, Christopher J. ; Ferrare, Richard ; Hostetler, Chris ; Hair, Johnathan. / Using combined 532 nm HSRL and 1064 nm elastic-scatter lidar observations to verify and update cram dual-wavelength aerosol retrieval models. International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). Vol. 2 1. ed. 2008.
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