Using social contextual information to match criminal identities

G. Alan Wang, Jennifer J. Xu, Hsinchun Chen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Criminal identity matching is crucial to crime investigation in law enforcement agencies. Existing techniques match identities that refer to the same individuals based on simple identity features. These techniques are subject to several problems. First, there is an effectiveness trade-off between the false negative and false positive rates. The improvement of one rate usually lowers the other. Second, in some situations such as identity theft, simple-feature-based techniques are unable to match identities that have completely different identity feature values. We argue that the information about the social context of an individual may provide additional information for revealing the individual's identity, helping improve the effectiveness of identity matching techniques. We define two types of social contextual features: role-based personal features and social group features. Experiments showed that social contextual features, especially the structural similarity and the relational similarity, significantly improved the precision without lowering the recall of criminal identity matching tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Event39th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS'06 - Kauai, HI, United States
Duration: Jan 4 2006Jan 7 2006

Other

Other39th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS'06
CountryUnited States
CityKauai, HI
Period1/4/061/7/06

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Crime
Law enforcement
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Wang, G. A., Xu, J. J., & Chen, H. (2006). Using social contextual information to match criminal identities. In Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (Vol. 4). [1579451] https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2006.525

Using social contextual information to match criminal identities. / Wang, G. Alan; Xu, Jennifer J.; Chen, Hsinchun.

Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. Vol. 4 2006. 1579451.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Wang, GA, Xu, JJ & Chen, H 2006, Using social contextual information to match criminal identities. in Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. vol. 4, 1579451, 39th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS'06, Kauai, HI, United States, 1/4/06. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2006.525
Wang GA, Xu JJ, Chen H. Using social contextual information to match criminal identities. In Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. Vol. 4. 2006. 1579451 https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2006.525
Wang, G. Alan ; Xu, Jennifer J. ; Chen, Hsinchun. / Using social contextual information to match criminal identities. Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. Vol. 4 2006.
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