Using speeded cognitive, reading, and academic measures to determine the need for extended test time among university students with learning disabilities

Nicole Ofiesh, Nancy - Mather, Andrea Russell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between scores on "speeded" cognitive and academic tests and the need for the accommodation of extended test time for normally achieving students (NA) and students with learning disabilities (LD). Often, in postsecondary settings the decision to provide the accommodation of extended test time is based largely on the diagnostic test scores in the student's LD documentation. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between specific diagnostic tests and the need for the accommodation of extended test time. A secondary purpose was to investigate the relationships and predictive ability of five speeded cognitive tests, three speeded cluster scores, and two measures of timed reading. Correlations and logistic regression analyses were used to assess gain in score performance and predict the need for extended test time. Participants included 41 NA university students and 43 university students with LD. The findings indicated significant group differences on all speeded cognitive, reading, and academic tests, with the exception of Digit Symbol on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III and Retrieval Fluency and Decision Speed tests on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities. The Reading Fluency test and the Academic Fluency cluster of the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement III were the best predictors of students with LD who needed extended time on the multiple-choice reading comprehension test.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-52
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Psychoeducational Assessment
Volume23
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 2005

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Learning Disorders
learning disability
Reading
Students
university
student
Aptitude
Routine Diagnostic Tests
accommodation
time
Intelligence
Documentation
diagnostic
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
cognitive ability
documentation
intelligence
symbol
comprehension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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