Using wearables to screen motor performance deterioration because of cancer and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in adults - Toward an early diagnosis of CIPN

Mohsen Zahiri, Kevin M. Chen, He Zhou, Hung Nguyen, Biruh T. Workeneh, Sarvari V. Yellapragada, Yvonne H. Sada, Michael Schwenk, Bijan Najafi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: An essential component for optimizing quality of life in adults with cancer is determining the degree to which therapy may negatively impact motor-performance, so that patients can maintain their quality of life and independence. This study examined whether instrumented gait and balance could determine the magnitude of deterioration in motor-performance from chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Methods: We recruited 84 adults with cancer (age = 71.1 ± 9.7 years old, BMI = 26.8 ± 6.2 kg/m2, gender = 56%female) and 57 age-matched non-cancer patients (age = 69.5 ± 9.8 years old, BMI = 27.1 ± 6.0 kg/m2, gender = 79%female). Based on clinical screening, the group with cancer was classified into two groups: participants with CIPN (CIPN+) and without CIPN (CIPN-). Gait and balance were quantified using validated wearables. The Vibration Perception Threshold (VPT) test was used to stratify the CIPN+ group into mild (Mild-CIPN) and severe (Severe-CIPN) subgroups. Results: All gait and balance parameters were deteriorated in the group with cancer compared to non-cancer group with the largest effects observed for stride-time (11%, Cohen's effect size d = 1.00, p < 0.001) and eyes-closed ankle sway (94%, d = 0.49, p = 0.001). The same trend was observed when the Severe-CIPN subgroup was compared to the Mild-CIPN. VPT correlates significantly with motor deterioration, with the largest correlation found in stride-time (Rho = 0.37, p = 0.007). Severe-CIPN subjects were significantly older and overall had more deterioration in the majority of motor-performance parameters after adjusting for age (p < 0.050). Conclusion: These results confirmed the negative impact of CIPN on motor-performance with the largest effects on ankle stability and stride-time. VPT is a predictor of motor deterioration and may be used to determine the severity of CIPN symptom.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Geriatric Oncology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adults with cancer
  • Balance
  • Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Falls
  • Gait
  • Motor performance
  • Neuropathy
  • Plantar numbness
  • Wearables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Using wearables to screen motor performance deterioration because of cancer and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in adults - Toward an early diagnosis of CIPN'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this