Utilization of a non-preserved cadaver to address deficiencies in technical skills during the third year of medical school: A cadaver model for teaching technical skills

Stephen J. Kaplan, Joseph T. Carroll, Saman Nematollahi, Andy Chuu, William - Adamas-Rappaport, Evan Ong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Emergency technical procedures performed by medical students have decreased in the last decade. An Emergency Surgical Skills Laboratory (ESSL) using a non-preserved cadaver was developed in response to address this deficiency. Methods A total of 232 students rotating through a 6-week surgery clerkship participated in the ESSL from1 July 2008 to 1 July 2011. Two four-hour sessions using case-based trauma scenarios in the ESSL served as a model for procedural instruction. Skills taught included basic suturing, intubation, cricothyrotomy, chest tube placement, thoracentesis, venous access, central line, and radial arterial line placement. Results Students noted that technical proficiency in suturing was obtained during the ESSL sessions in comparison to the emergency department or operating room (p\0.001) during the 6-week clerkship. During the 6-week rotation only 12 % of students participated in chest tube insertion, 5 % central venous line placement, and 14 % femoral vein blood draw. Finally, 90 % of respondent reported increased understanding and comfort in regard to trauma resuscitation following the ESSL. Conclusions Technical procedural proficiency has become increasingly difficult to obtain in medical school due to multifactorial limitations. The ESSL provides an opportunity for developing technical skills needed for emergency situations not otherwise provided during the surgical clerkship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)953-955
Number of pages3
JournalWorld Journal of Surgery
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

Medical Schools
Cadaver
Teaching
Emergencies
Chest Tubes
Students
Hospital Emergency Service
Vascular Access Devices
Femoral Vein
Wounds and Injuries
Operating Rooms
Medical Students
Intubation
Resuscitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Utilization of a non-preserved cadaver to address deficiencies in technical skills during the third year of medical school : A cadaver model for teaching technical skills. / Kaplan, Stephen J.; Carroll, Joseph T.; Nematollahi, Saman; Chuu, Andy; Adamas-Rappaport, William -; Ong, Evan.

In: World Journal of Surgery, Vol. 37, No. 5, 05.2013, p. 953-955.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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