Validation of EO-1 Hyperion and Advanced Land Imager Using the Radiometric Calibration Test Site at Railroad Valley, Nevada

Jeffrey S Czapla-Myers, Lawrence Ong, Kurtis Thome, Joel McCorkel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Earth-Observing One (EO-1) satellite was launched in 2000. Radiometric calibration of Hyperion and the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) has been performed throughout the mission lifetime using various techniques that include ground-based vicarious calibration, pseudo-invariant calibration sites, and also the moon. The EO-1 mission is nearing its useful lifetime, and this work seeks to validate the radiometric calibration of Hyperion and ALI from 2013 until the satellite is decommissioned. Hyperion and ALI have been routinely collecting data at the automated Radiometric Calibration Test Site [RadCaTS/Railroad Valley (RRV)] since launch. In support of this study, the frequency of the acquisitions at RadCaTS has been significantly increased since 2013, which provides an opportunity to analyze the radiometric stability and accuracy during the final stages of the EO-1 mission. The analysis of Hyperion and ALI is performed using a suite of ground instrumentation that measures the atmosphere and surface throughout the day. The final product is an estimate of the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) spectral radiance, which is compared to Hyperion and ALI radiances. The results show that Hyperion agrees with the RadCaTS predictions to within 5% in the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) and to within 10% in the shortwave infrared (SWIR). The 2013–2014 ALI results show agreement to within 6% in the VNIR and 7.5% in the SWIR bands. A cross-comparison between ALI and the Operational Land Imager (OLI) using RadCaTS as a transfer source shows agreement of 3%–6% during the period of 2013–2014.

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computers in Earth Sciences
  • Atmospheric Science

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