Vapor pressure deficit helps explain biogenic volatile organic compound fluxes from the forest floor and canopy of a temperate deciduous forest

Paul C. Stoy, Amy M. Trowbridge, Mario B. Siqueira, Livia Souza Freire, Richard P. Phillips, Luke Jacobs, Susanne Wiesner, Russell K. Monson, Kimberly A. Novick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) play critical roles in ecological and earth-system processes. Ecosystem BVOC models rarely include soil and litter fluxes and their accuracy is often challenged by BVOC dynamics during periods of rapid ecosystem change like spring leaf out. We measured BVOC concentrations within the air space of a mixed deciduous forest and used a hybrid Lagrangian/Eulerian canopy transport model to estimate BVOC flux from the forest floor, canopy, and whole ecosystem during spring. Canopy flux measurements were dominated by a large methanol source and small isoprene source during the leaf-out period, consistent with past measurements of leaf ontogeny and theory, and indicative of a BVOC flux situation rarely used in emissions model testing. The contribution of the forest floor to whole-ecosystem BVOC flux is conditional on the compound of interest and is often non-trivial. We created linear models of forest floor, canopy, and whole-ecosystem flux for each study compound and used information criteria-based model selection to find the simplest model with the best fit. Most published BVOC flux models do not include vapor pressure deficit (VPD), but it entered the best canopy, forest floor, and whole-ecosystem BVOC flux model more than any other study variable in the present study. Since VPD is predicted to increase in the future, future studies should investigate how it contributes to BVOC flux through biophysical mechanisms like evaporative demand, leaf temperature and stomatal function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalOecologia
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Inverse model
  • Isoprene
  • Methanol
  • Monoterpenes
  • Proton transfer reaction mass spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

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