Variation of lycopene, antioxidant activity, total soluble solids and weight loss of tomato during postharvest storage

Jamal Javanmardi, Chieri Kubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

180 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The time between harvesting and consumption of fruit or vegetables could be up to several weeks. Phytochemical reactions in response to environmental conditions of harvested fruit or vegetables during this period may change the level of biological and medicinal activities of particular compounds. Therefore, quantification of such phytochemical reactions is a critical point in designing nutritional value studies. Red stage ripened cluster tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Clermon) grown hydroponically in greenhouses were analyzed for variation of lycopene, hydrophilic antioxidant activity (using TEAC assay), total soluble solids and weight loss during two subsequent weeks of storing at 12 and 5 °C in comparison to 7 d room temperature storage as control. Low temperature storage at 5 °C in compare to 12 °C inhibited weight loss and enhancement of lycopene and TSS but antioxidant activity was increased as much as 1.77 times. Room temperature stored tomatoes showed significant increase in lycopene content and weight loss, but no effect on TSS and antioxidant activity during 7 d storage. TSS was not affected either by room temperature or low temperature storage, but weight loss, lycopene content and antioxidant activity at room temperature in compare to low temperature stored tomatoes were significantly different. It seems chilling stress shifts the pathways involved in the biosynthesis of antioxidant active compounds into higher levels of production. The results showed that postharvest environmental conditions need to be considered carefully for evaluation of particular bioactive compounds in fresh fruit and vegetables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-155
Number of pages5
JournalPostharvest Biology and Technology
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006

Fingerprint

Lycopersicon esculentum
lycopene
total soluble solids
Weight Loss
ambient temperature
weight loss
Antioxidants
antioxidant activity
tomatoes
Temperature
storage temperature
phytopharmaceuticals
Vegetables
Fruit
Phytochemicals
environmental factors
raw vegetables
vegetable consumption
fruit consumption
raw fruit

Keywords

  • Antioxidant activity
  • Extraction
  • Lycopene
  • Postharvest
  • Tomato
  • Total soluble solids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Food Science
  • Horticulture

Cite this

Variation of lycopene, antioxidant activity, total soluble solids and weight loss of tomato during postharvest storage. / Javanmardi, Jamal; Kubota, Chieri.

In: Postharvest Biology and Technology, Vol. 41, No. 2, 08.2006, p. 151-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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