Ventilator-supported communication: A survey of speech-language pathologists

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Questionnaires regarding ventilator-supported communication were sent to 150 speech-language pathologists in the United States. Fifty-seven questionnaires were completed and returned. Results indicated that respondents had had little or no graduate course-work in ventilator-supported communication; rather, the majority of their education and training had come from on-the-job experience and through continuing education opportunities. Respondents reported that the three most common speech and/or voice problems in ventilated patients were related to speech loudness, speech duration, and vocal quality. To enhance communication in their ventilator-supported patients, they used a wide variety of strategies and assistive devices. Finally, many respondents provided suggestions for future research in ventilator-supported communication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-273
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology
Volume5
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1997

Fingerprint

Mechanical Ventilators
Language
Communication
Self-Help Devices
Continuing Education
Pathologists
Surveys and Questionnaires
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Ventilator-supported communication : A survey of speech-language pathologists. / Isaki, Emi; Hoit, Jeannette Dee.

In: Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, Vol. 5, No. 4, 12.1997, p. 263-273.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6efd7c52e2704d07af4ed70262c72f41,
title = "Ventilator-supported communication: A survey of speech-language pathologists",
abstract = "Questionnaires regarding ventilator-supported communication were sent to 150 speech-language pathologists in the United States. Fifty-seven questionnaires were completed and returned. Results indicated that respondents had had little or no graduate course-work in ventilator-supported communication; rather, the majority of their education and training had come from on-the-job experience and through continuing education opportunities. Respondents reported that the three most common speech and/or voice problems in ventilated patients were related to speech loudness, speech duration, and vocal quality. To enhance communication in their ventilator-supported patients, they used a wide variety of strategies and assistive devices. Finally, many respondents provided suggestions for future research in ventilator-supported communication.",
author = "Emi Isaki and Hoit, {Jeannette Dee}",
year = "1997",
month = "12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "263--273",
journal = "Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology",
issn = "1065-1438",
publisher = "Delmar Learning",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ventilator-supported communication

T2 - A survey of speech-language pathologists

AU - Isaki, Emi

AU - Hoit, Jeannette Dee

PY - 1997/12

Y1 - 1997/12

N2 - Questionnaires regarding ventilator-supported communication were sent to 150 speech-language pathologists in the United States. Fifty-seven questionnaires were completed and returned. Results indicated that respondents had had little or no graduate course-work in ventilator-supported communication; rather, the majority of their education and training had come from on-the-job experience and through continuing education opportunities. Respondents reported that the three most common speech and/or voice problems in ventilated patients were related to speech loudness, speech duration, and vocal quality. To enhance communication in their ventilator-supported patients, they used a wide variety of strategies and assistive devices. Finally, many respondents provided suggestions for future research in ventilator-supported communication.

AB - Questionnaires regarding ventilator-supported communication were sent to 150 speech-language pathologists in the United States. Fifty-seven questionnaires were completed and returned. Results indicated that respondents had had little or no graduate course-work in ventilator-supported communication; rather, the majority of their education and training had come from on-the-job experience and through continuing education opportunities. Respondents reported that the three most common speech and/or voice problems in ventilated patients were related to speech loudness, speech duration, and vocal quality. To enhance communication in their ventilator-supported patients, they used a wide variety of strategies and assistive devices. Finally, many respondents provided suggestions for future research in ventilator-supported communication.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0004981121&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0004981121&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0004981121

VL - 5

SP - 263

EP - 273

JO - Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology

JF - Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology

SN - 1065-1438

IS - 4

ER -