Victim of success: American dominance and terrorism

David Sobek, Alex R Braithwaite

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While terrorist attacks against American interests represent an important topic, few studies use international relations theory and a rigorous statistical methodology to examine their occurrence. In recognition of these shortcomings, this paper hypothesizes and tests a simple yet powerful relationship: as American dominance of the international system increases, the number of attacks against its interests will also rise. This relationship exists because American dominance leaves little room for revisionist actors to alter the status quo through conventional means, which makes terrorist methods an increasingly likely choice. Using ARIMA modeling techniques on a data set that spans from 1968-1996, we gain confirmation that increasing levels of American dominance are positively correlated with large numbers of attacks against American interests.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-148
Number of pages14
JournalConflict Management and Peace Science
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

terrorism
international system
international relations
methodology
Terrorism
Attack
International relations
Terrorist attack
Status quo
Methodology
Modeling

Keywords

  • American dominance
  • ARIMA
  • Terrorism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Victim of success : American dominance and terrorism. / Sobek, David; Braithwaite, Alex R.

In: Conflict Management and Peace Science, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2005, p. 135-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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