Violence against women: Mental health effects. Part II. Conceptualizations of posttraumatic stress

Lisa A. Goodman, Mary P Koss, Nancy Felipe Russo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A broad range of psychological aftereffects have been noted among women who have experienced male-perpetrated violence. These symptoms vary considerably among individuals, across social contexts, and across different types of violent encounters (Coley & Beckett, 1988; Goodman, Koss, & Russo, 1992; Koss, 1988; Straus, Gelles, & Steinmetz, 1980). Nevertheless, a remarkably consistent picture of the psychological sequelae of violence-particularly sexual and physical assault-emerges from the empirical and clinical literature (Koss, 1988). In this article, we use the posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis-a frame that captures many of the disparate symptoms described by researchers-as a basis for exploring several conceptual models that have been developed to explain women's responses to violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-130
Number of pages8
JournalApplied and Preventive Psychology
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

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Women's Health
Violence
Mental Health
Psychology
Sex Offenses
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Research Personnel
Physical Abuse

Keywords

  • Physical assault
  • Posttraumatic stress
  • Sexual assault
  • Trauma
  • Violence
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Violence against women : Mental health effects. Part II. Conceptualizations of posttraumatic stress. / Goodman, Lisa A.; Koss, Mary P; Russo, Nancy Felipe.

In: Applied and Preventive Psychology, Vol. 2, No. 3, 1993, p. 123-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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