Violence and Vulnerability of Female Migrants in Drop Houses in Arizona: The Predictable Outcome of a Chain Reaction of Violence

William Paul Simmons, Cecilia Menjívar, Michelle Téllez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

This qualitative research study examines the experiences of immigrant women crossing the U.S./Mexico border and the proliferation of “drop houses” in Arizona as a new phenomenon, one that is often marked by kidnappings and sexual assault. Little research has been published on the violence women face on their journey, and the drop houses have almost completely escaped scholarly analysis. We argue that the drop houses must be seen as a consequence of a “state of emergency” declared by policy makers that led to changes in U.S. national and local immigration policies that fueled what we call a “chain reaction of violence.”

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)551-570
Number of pages20
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 18 2015

Keywords

  • U.S./Mexico border
  • gender and migration
  • sexual violence
  • states of exception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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