VIRUSES IN WATER: THE PROBLEM, SOME SOLUTIONS.

Charles P Gerba, Craig Wallis, Joseph L. Melnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increased demands on our available water resources because of the concurrent increase in world population and industrial demand make recycling of domestic wastewater inevitable in the future. This plus the provisions of the Federal Water Pollution Control Amendments of 1972 (P. L. 92-500), which require zero discharge of pollutants into the nation's water by 1985, have placed an urgent need on the development of recycling methods. One of the major problems to be overcome is the development of adequate methods to ensure the elimination of human pathogenic viruses from reclaimed water. Compounding this problem is the concern that present water treatment procedures may not regularly be sufficient in preventing viruses from reaching community water supplies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1122-1125
Number of pages4
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume9
Issue number13
StatePublished - Dec 1975
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Viruses
Recycling
virus
recycling
Water pollution control
Water
Water resources
Water treatment
Water supply
water pollution
pollution control
water treatment
Wastewater
water supply
water resource
wastewater
water
pollutant
demand
method

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Engineering

Cite this

VIRUSES IN WATER : THE PROBLEM, SOME SOLUTIONS. / Gerba, Charles P; Wallis, Craig; Melnick, Joseph L.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 9, No. 13, 12.1975, p. 1122-1125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gerba, CP, Wallis, C & Melnick, JL 1975, 'VIRUSES IN WATER: THE PROBLEM, SOME SOLUTIONS.', Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 9, no. 13, pp. 1122-1125.
Gerba, Charles P ; Wallis, Craig ; Melnick, Joseph L. / VIRUSES IN WATER : THE PROBLEM, SOME SOLUTIONS. In: Environmental Science and Technology. 1975 ; Vol. 9, No. 13. pp. 1122-1125.
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