Vitamin A, carotenoids, and risk of persistent oncogenic human papillomavirus infection

Rebecca L. Sedjo, Denise Roe, Martha Abrahamsen, Robin B Harris, Neal Craft, Susie Baldwin, Anna R. Giuliano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the main etiologic factor for cervical neoplasia, although infection alone is insufficient to produce disease. Cofactors such as nutritional factors may be necessary for viral progression to neoplasia. Results from previous studies have suggested that higher dietary consumption and circulating levels of certain micronutrients may be protective against cervical neoplasia. This study evaluated the role of vitamin A and carotenoids on HPV persistence comparing women with intermittent and persistent infections. As determined by the Hybrid Capture II system, oncogenic HPV infections were assessed at baseline and at approximately 3 and 9 months postbaseline. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the risk of persistent HPV infection associated with each tertile of dietary and circulating micronutrients. Higher levels of vegetable consumption were associated with a 54% decrease risk of HPV persistence (adjusted odds ratio, 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.21-0.97). Also, a 56% reduction in HPV persistence risk was observed in women with the highest plasma cis-lycopene concentrations compared with women with the lowest plasma cis-lycopene concentrations (adjusted odds ratio, 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.19-1.01). These data suggest that vegetable consumption and circulating cis-lycopene may be protective against HPV persistence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)876-884
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume11
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2002

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Papillomavirus Infections
Carotenoids
Vitamin A
Micronutrients
Vegetables
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Neoplasms
Infection
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
lycopene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Vitamin A, carotenoids, and risk of persistent oncogenic human papillomavirus infection. / Sedjo, Rebecca L.; Roe, Denise; Abrahamsen, Martha; Harris, Robin B; Craft, Neal; Baldwin, Susie; Giuliano, Anna R.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 11, No. 9, 09.2002, p. 876-884.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sedjo, RL, Roe, D, Abrahamsen, M, Harris, RB, Craft, N, Baldwin, S & Giuliano, AR 2002, 'Vitamin A, carotenoids, and risk of persistent oncogenic human papillomavirus infection', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 11, no. 9, pp. 876-884.
Sedjo, Rebecca L. ; Roe, Denise ; Abrahamsen, Martha ; Harris, Robin B ; Craft, Neal ; Baldwin, Susie ; Giuliano, Anna R. / Vitamin A, carotenoids, and risk of persistent oncogenic human papillomavirus infection. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2002 ; Vol. 11, No. 9. pp. 876-884.
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