Vitamin D and immune response

Implications for prostate cancer in African Americans

Ken Batai, Adam B. Murphy, Larisa Nonn, Rick A Kittles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer among men in the U.S. African American (AA) men have a higher incidence and mortality rate compared to European American (EA) men, but the cause of PCa disparities is still unclear. Epidemiologic studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency is associated with advanced stage and higher tumor grade and mortality, while its association with overall PCa risk is inconsistent. Vitamin D deficiency is also more common in AAs than EAs, and the difference in serum vitamin D levels may help explain the PCa disparities. However, the role of vitamin D in aggressive PCa in AAs is not well explored. Studies demonstrated that the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, has anti-inflammatory effects by mediating immune-related gene expression in prostate tissue. Inflammation also plays an important role in PCa pathogenesis and progression, and expression of immune-related genes in PCa tissues differs significantly between AAs and EAs. Unfortunately, the evidence linking vitamin D and immune response in relation to PCa is still scarce. This relationship should be further explored at a genomic level in AA populations that are at high risk for vitamin D deficiency and fatal PCa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number53
JournalFrontiers in Immunology
Volume7
Issue numberFEB
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Vitamin D
African Americans
Prostatic Neoplasms
Vitamin D Deficiency
Mortality
Epidemiologic Studies
Prostate
Neoplasms
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Inflammation
Gene Expression
Incidence
Serum
Genes

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Health disparities
  • Inflammation
  • Prostate cancer
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Vitamin D and immune response : Implications for prostate cancer in African Americans. / Batai, Ken; Murphy, Adam B.; Nonn, Larisa; Kittles, Rick A.

In: Frontiers in Immunology, Vol. 7, No. FEB, 53, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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