Vitamin E supplementation at various levels alters cytokine production by thymocytes during retrovirus infection causing murine AIDS

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Abstract

Female C57BL/6 mice were infected with LP-BM5 retrovirus, causing murine AIDS which is functionally similar to human AIDS. Retrovirus infection targets the thymus producing altered T-cell differentiation via the dysregulation of thymocyte cytokine production. Therefore the effects of dietary vitamin E at various levels were determined on cytokine production by ConA-stimulated thymocytes from uninfected (normal) and retrovirus-infected mice. Dietary supplementation, with a 15-, 150- and 450-fold increase of vitamin E in the diet modulated interleukin-2 (IL) production in both uninfected mice and retrovirus-infected mice. The 150- and 450-fold vitamin E supplementation significantly reduced IL-4 secretion by thymocytes from the uninfected, normal mice. Supplementation at all levels also significantly reduced IL-4 production by thymocytes, which was elevated by the retrovirus infection. Vitamin E significantly reduced IL-6 and interferon-γ production increased during the progression to murine AIDS. The effects of dietary vitamin E on conA-induced proliferation of thymocytes were consistent with the finding on changes of IL-2 secretion. No effect of dietary vitamin E on thymus weight was observed in both uninfected and retrovirus-infected mice. These data indicate that dietary vitamin E supplementation at extremely high levels can modulate cytokine production by thymocytes. This could affect T-cell differentiation, especially during murine AIDS when cytokine production was partially normalized by vitamin E supplementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-165
Number of pages13
JournalThymus
Volume22
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1994

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Murine Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Retroviridae Infections
Thymocytes
Vitamin E
Cytokines
Interleukin-2
Retroviridae
Interleukin-4
Thymus Gland
Cell Differentiation
T-Lymphocytes
Dietary Supplements
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Interferons
Interleukin-6
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Diet
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • cytokine
  • murine AIDS
  • T-cell differentiation
  • thymocyte
  • vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

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abstract = "Female C57BL/6 mice were infected with LP-BM5 retrovirus, causing murine AIDS which is functionally similar to human AIDS. Retrovirus infection targets the thymus producing altered T-cell differentiation via the dysregulation of thymocyte cytokine production. Therefore the effects of dietary vitamin E at various levels were determined on cytokine production by ConA-stimulated thymocytes from uninfected (normal) and retrovirus-infected mice. Dietary supplementation, with a 15-, 150- and 450-fold increase of vitamin E in the diet modulated interleukin-2 (IL) production in both uninfected mice and retrovirus-infected mice. The 150- and 450-fold vitamin E supplementation significantly reduced IL-4 secretion by thymocytes from the uninfected, normal mice. Supplementation at all levels also significantly reduced IL-4 production by thymocytes, which was elevated by the retrovirus infection. Vitamin E significantly reduced IL-6 and interferon-γ production increased during the progression to murine AIDS. The effects of dietary vitamin E on conA-induced proliferation of thymocytes were consistent with the finding on changes of IL-2 secretion. No effect of dietary vitamin E on thymus weight was observed in both uninfected and retrovirus-infected mice. These data indicate that dietary vitamin E supplementation at extremely high levels can modulate cytokine production by thymocytes. This could affect T-cell differentiation, especially during murine AIDS when cytokine production was partially normalized by vitamin E supplementation.",
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AB - Female C57BL/6 mice were infected with LP-BM5 retrovirus, causing murine AIDS which is functionally similar to human AIDS. Retrovirus infection targets the thymus producing altered T-cell differentiation via the dysregulation of thymocyte cytokine production. Therefore the effects of dietary vitamin E at various levels were determined on cytokine production by ConA-stimulated thymocytes from uninfected (normal) and retrovirus-infected mice. Dietary supplementation, with a 15-, 150- and 450-fold increase of vitamin E in the diet modulated interleukin-2 (IL) production in both uninfected mice and retrovirus-infected mice. The 150- and 450-fold vitamin E supplementation significantly reduced IL-4 secretion by thymocytes from the uninfected, normal mice. Supplementation at all levels also significantly reduced IL-4 production by thymocytes, which was elevated by the retrovirus infection. Vitamin E significantly reduced IL-6 and interferon-γ production increased during the progression to murine AIDS. The effects of dietary vitamin E on conA-induced proliferation of thymocytes were consistent with the finding on changes of IL-2 secretion. No effect of dietary vitamin E on thymus weight was observed in both uninfected and retrovirus-infected mice. These data indicate that dietary vitamin E supplementation at extremely high levels can modulate cytokine production by thymocytes. This could affect T-cell differentiation, especially during murine AIDS when cytokine production was partially normalized by vitamin E supplementation.

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