Water management and biodiversity conservation interface in Mexico: A geographical analysis

Rolando E. Díaz-Caravantes, Christopher A Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Leading scholars and global institutions emphasize the urgency of balancing human livelihood needs with the demands of the environment, particularly for water. In Mexico, the interface between water and environmental conservation is manifested in initiatives to enlarge " natural protected areas" in order to protect both hydrological basins as water sources as well as ecosystems and the services they provide. However, the spatial overlaps, hydrological-biological interactions, and multiple stakeholder institutional interfaces between protected areas and basins remain poorly understood, particularly the ways in which conservation areas are being reconfigured by human water use. Employing spatial analysis, volumes of water concessions, and institutional mapping methods, this paper examines the policy and resource dimensions of groundwater use in the Río Cuchujaqui watershed and its implications for ecosystem services in the Sierra de Álamos protected area in northwestern Mexico. Competing water and environmental institutional mandates have prevented the formulation of a water management program for conservation purposes. Geographical expansion of the Sierra de Álamos will confront pre-existing Río Cuchujaqui groundwater uses outside the area currently protected. This impasse can only be resolved by capping groundwater at levels that permit current ecosystem function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-354
Number of pages12
JournalApplied Geography
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

Fingerprint

water management
biodiversity
protected area
Mexico
conservation
conservation areas
water
groundwater
mapping method
basins
capping
ecosystem function
spatial analysis
basin
ecosystem service
ecosystems
conservation programs
water use
concession
livelihood

Keywords

  • Conservation
  • Institutional policy
  • Mexico
  • Spatial analysis
  • Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Water management and biodiversity conservation interface in Mexico : A geographical analysis. / Díaz-Caravantes, Rolando E.; Scott, Christopher A.

In: Applied Geography, Vol. 30, No. 3, 07.2010, p. 343-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5a1f08c1ec574e3fb932a9f41a62ac5f,
title = "Water management and biodiversity conservation interface in Mexico: A geographical analysis",
abstract = "Leading scholars and global institutions emphasize the urgency of balancing human livelihood needs with the demands of the environment, particularly for water. In Mexico, the interface between water and environmental conservation is manifested in initiatives to enlarge {"} natural protected areas{"} in order to protect both hydrological basins as water sources as well as ecosystems and the services they provide. However, the spatial overlaps, hydrological-biological interactions, and multiple stakeholder institutional interfaces between protected areas and basins remain poorly understood, particularly the ways in which conservation areas are being reconfigured by human water use. Employing spatial analysis, volumes of water concessions, and institutional mapping methods, this paper examines the policy and resource dimensions of groundwater use in the R{\'i}o Cuchujaqui watershed and its implications for ecosystem services in the Sierra de {\'A}lamos protected area in northwestern Mexico. Competing water and environmental institutional mandates have prevented the formulation of a water management program for conservation purposes. Geographical expansion of the Sierra de {\'A}lamos will confront pre-existing R{\'i}o Cuchujaqui groundwater uses outside the area currently protected. This impasse can only be resolved by capping groundwater at levels that permit current ecosystem function.",
keywords = "Conservation, Institutional policy, Mexico, Spatial analysis, Water",
author = "D{\'i}az-Caravantes, {Rolando E.} and Scott, {Christopher A}",
year = "2010",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.apgeog.2009.10.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "343--354",
journal = "Applied Geography",
issn = "0143-6228",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Water management and biodiversity conservation interface in Mexico

T2 - A geographical analysis

AU - Díaz-Caravantes, Rolando E.

AU - Scott, Christopher A

PY - 2010/7

Y1 - 2010/7

N2 - Leading scholars and global institutions emphasize the urgency of balancing human livelihood needs with the demands of the environment, particularly for water. In Mexico, the interface between water and environmental conservation is manifested in initiatives to enlarge " natural protected areas" in order to protect both hydrological basins as water sources as well as ecosystems and the services they provide. However, the spatial overlaps, hydrological-biological interactions, and multiple stakeholder institutional interfaces between protected areas and basins remain poorly understood, particularly the ways in which conservation areas are being reconfigured by human water use. Employing spatial analysis, volumes of water concessions, and institutional mapping methods, this paper examines the policy and resource dimensions of groundwater use in the Río Cuchujaqui watershed and its implications for ecosystem services in the Sierra de Álamos protected area in northwestern Mexico. Competing water and environmental institutional mandates have prevented the formulation of a water management program for conservation purposes. Geographical expansion of the Sierra de Álamos will confront pre-existing Río Cuchujaqui groundwater uses outside the area currently protected. This impasse can only be resolved by capping groundwater at levels that permit current ecosystem function.

AB - Leading scholars and global institutions emphasize the urgency of balancing human livelihood needs with the demands of the environment, particularly for water. In Mexico, the interface between water and environmental conservation is manifested in initiatives to enlarge " natural protected areas" in order to protect both hydrological basins as water sources as well as ecosystems and the services they provide. However, the spatial overlaps, hydrological-biological interactions, and multiple stakeholder institutional interfaces between protected areas and basins remain poorly understood, particularly the ways in which conservation areas are being reconfigured by human water use. Employing spatial analysis, volumes of water concessions, and institutional mapping methods, this paper examines the policy and resource dimensions of groundwater use in the Río Cuchujaqui watershed and its implications for ecosystem services in the Sierra de Álamos protected area in northwestern Mexico. Competing water and environmental institutional mandates have prevented the formulation of a water management program for conservation purposes. Geographical expansion of the Sierra de Álamos will confront pre-existing Río Cuchujaqui groundwater uses outside the area currently protected. This impasse can only be resolved by capping groundwater at levels that permit current ecosystem function.

KW - Conservation

KW - Institutional policy

KW - Mexico

KW - Spatial analysis

KW - Water

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77952551791&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77952551791&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.apgeog.2009.10.003

DO - 10.1016/j.apgeog.2009.10.003

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:77952551791

VL - 30

SP - 343

EP - 354

JO - Applied Geography

JF - Applied Geography

SN - 0143-6228

IS - 3

ER -