What does “first nation deep roots in the forests” mean? Identification of principles and objectives for promoting forest-based development

Jean Michel Beaudoin, Luc Bouthillier, Janette Bulkan, Harry Nelson, Ronald Trosper, Stephen Wyatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

We often hear about the resistance of First Nation (FN) communities to the industrial model of forestry, but we hear less about what they wish to achieve. Translating FN perspectives into concepts that are understood by the mainstream society can help inform current and future forest policies. Such translation can support initiatives that seek ways to increase FN participation in the forest sector. This paper documents one process of translation. It identifies the principles and objectives for forest-based development of the Essipit Innu First Nation in Quebec, Canada, reflective of the deep roots that anchor the Essipit to their territory. Based on participatory research carried out between January and July 2013, we identify 34 objectives folded into three core FN principles: Nutshimiu-Aitun (identity-territoriality), Mishkutunam (sharing-exchange), and Pakassitishun (responsibility-autonomy). Our analysis shows that the economic aims of the dominant forestry model are too narrow for FN communities. This paper contributes to expanding FN engagement in forestry through management and economic approaches that are better adapted to their culture and values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)508-519
Number of pages12
JournalCanadian Journal of Forest Research
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Culture
  • First nation
  • Forestry
  • Quebec
  • Sustainable development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Ecology
  • Forestry

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