When more is better: A counter-narrative regarding keyword and subject retrieval in digitized diaries

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Many commercial full-text databases and digital libraries provide keyword and preferred-term (subject) indexing, but few allow participatory tagging of content by users or provide ontologies in support of natural language information retrieval. Consequently, keyword and subject searching strategies still matter. But keyword searching, because it can yield results high in recall and low in precision, is often seen as a beginner's strategy best replaced by subject searching using authoritative headings and descriptors. In certain circumstance explored in this essay, keyword searching may be quite effective in and of itself for retrieving digitized primary sources for the study of history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Classification Research Online
Volume18
StatePublished - 2007
Event18th Annual ASIS SIG/CR Classification Research Workshop, ASIS 2007 - Milwaukee, WI, United States
Duration: Oct 20 2007Oct 20 2007

Other

Other18th Annual ASIS SIG/CR Classification Research Workshop, ASIS 2007
CountryUnited States
CityMilwaukee, WI
Period10/20/0710/20/07

Fingerprint

Digital libraries
Query languages
Ontology
Retrieval
narrative
indexing
information retrieval
ontology
Digital Libraries
Tagging
Indexing
Information Retrieval
Natural Language
Descriptors
history
language
Narrative
Diary
Key words
Term

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

When more is better : A counter-narrative regarding keyword and subject retrieval in digitized diaries. / Knott, Cheryl Ann.

Advances in Classification Research Online. Vol. 18 2007.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Knott, CA 2007, When more is better: A counter-narrative regarding keyword and subject retrieval in digitized diaries. in Advances in Classification Research Online. vol. 18, 18th Annual ASIS SIG/CR Classification Research Workshop, ASIS 2007, Milwaukee, WI, United States, 10/20/07.
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