Where is the new world order?

Thomas J Volgy, L. E. Imwalle, J. E. Schwarz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors pursue the issue of new global architectural construction in the face of division between comparative and International Relations scholars over the issue of whether or not major states are declining in strength. Looking at the possibility of a hegemonic global structure for the 'new world order', they identify and apply Susan Strange's concepts of relative versus structural strength. They find that in relative terms the United States continues to exhibit strength in hegemonic proportions. However, in terms of structural strength, American capabilities are in substantial decline, even though its domestic strength has continued to increase. They conclude that although domestic conditions in the US are in synch with the potential for transferring domestic resources for external pursuits, such change is not likely.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-262
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of International Relations and Development
Volume2
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Volgy, T. J., Imwalle, L. E., & Schwarz, J. E. (1999). Where is the new world order? Journal of International Relations and Development, 2(3), 246-262.

Where is the new world order? / Volgy, Thomas J; Imwalle, L. E.; Schwarz, J. E.

In: Journal of International Relations and Development, Vol. 2, No. 3, 1999, p. 246-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Volgy, TJ, Imwalle, LE & Schwarz, JE 1999, 'Where is the new world order?', Journal of International Relations and Development, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 246-262.
Volgy, Thomas J ; Imwalle, L. E. ; Schwarz, J. E. / Where is the new world order?. In: Journal of International Relations and Development. 1999 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 246-262.
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