Why does peer instruction benefit student learning?

Jonathan G. Tullis, Robert L. Goldstone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In peer instruction, instructors pose a challenging question to students, students answer the question individually, students work with a partner in the class to discuss their answers, and finally students answer the question again. A large body of evidence shows that peer instruction benefits student learning. To determine the mechanism for these benefits, we collected semester-long data from six classes, involving a total of 208 undergraduate students being asked a total of 86 different questions related to their course content. For each question, students chose their answer individually, reported their confidence, discussed their answers with their partner, and then indicated their possibly revised answer and confidence again. Overall, students were more accurate and confident after discussion than before. Initially correct students were more likely to keep their answers than initially incorrect students, and this tendency was partially but not completely attributable to differences in confidence. We discuss the benefits of peer instruction in terms of differences in the coherence of explanations, social learning, and the contextual factors that influence confidence and accuracy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number15
JournalCognitive Research: Principles and Implications
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2020

Keywords

  • Confidence
  • Decision making
  • Group decisions
  • Metacognition
  • Peer instruction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Medicine(all)

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