Willingness for treatment as a predictor of retention and outcomes

J. R. Erickson, Sally J Stevens, P. McKnight, Aurelio J Figueredo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Retention in drug treatment is important to successful outcomes. The purpose of this study was to test assumptions made in the development and implementation of the ASSET project. The three assumptions were that living conditions of the homeless adult drug user influence willingness for treatment; willingness relates to treatment tenure; and, conditions, willingness and time in treatment influence treatment outcomes. Data on alcohol use, drug use, employment and housing as well as motivation, readiness and suitability of treatment were collected from 494 homeless adults at baseline and at follow-up. Data were subjected to multivariate causal analysis using factor analytic structural equations modeling. Practical fit indices were acceptable. The measurement model confirmed a higher order construct labelled willingness encompassing motivation, readiness and suitability. The structural model demonstrated that willingness positively related to treatment tenure; willingness positively influenced change in drug use and housing; and, tenure related positively to change in housing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-150
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Addictive Diseases
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

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Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Social Conditions
Structural Models
Drug Users
Multivariate Analysis
Alcohols

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Willingness for treatment as a predictor of retention and outcomes. / Erickson, J. R.; Stevens, Sally J; McKnight, P.; Figueredo, Aurelio J.

In: Journal of Addictive Diseases, Vol. 14, No. 4, 1995, p. 135-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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