Women's health perceptions and beliefs related to Zika virus exposure during the 2016 outbreak in northern Brazil

Elizabeth J. Anderson, Kacey C. Ernst, Francisco Fernando Martins, Cicera da Silva Martins, Mary P. Koss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During the 2016 Zika pandemic in Brazil, women's perceptions of infection risk, ability to adhere to Zika prevention strategies, or access to services following exposure were not emphasized in the public health response. Women in Fortaleza, Brazil, responded to a questionnaire on social factors related to perceived Zika risk and access to health care in June 2016. Data were coded using prespecified categories, and response frequency was reported. Of 37 respondents, most reported a lack of public services to support mosquito control (n = 19) or delayed access to reproductive health care (n = 14). Only 22% described specific maternal risks or fetal outcomes as a consequence of Zika infection. Respondents indicated an overall disconnect between public health efforts and women's perceptions of their reproductive control, including limited support concerning microcephaly in infants. Interventions targeting Zika may require a greater emphasis on strengthening health systems and infrastructure to realistically prevent transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)629-633
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume102
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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